MSU Undergraduate Research and Creative Discovery Program

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"A Shaky Truce: Civil Rights Struggles in Starkville, MS, 1960-1980"
Abstract:

We are looking for mature, responsible, and detail-oriented undergraduates or graduate students with strong interest in History, African American Studies, Education, Library Science, or Digital Humanities, and strong research and writing skills, to join us in this digital oral history project. This project is a collaborative effort between History Department and University Libraries faculty and students. We are conducting oral history interviews with members of the local community, doing archival research, and have launched a digital history website (starvillecivilrights.msstate.edu) featuring searchable interviews, digitized documents and illustrations, maps, and lesson plans for teachers. Our goal in "A Shaky Truce" is to highlight Starkville's civil rights stories and the voices of its participants in order to show how this community fits into the broader history of the national civil rights movement. Would you like to join our project team? We meet about once a month. Work for the project would take place on the MSU campus or at home. Because our funds are limited, these positions are unpaid only.

Subject:
Oral History Research Project--Academic Year Opportunity
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...035300 - History
Other - MSU Libraries
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Please contact either Dr. Judith Ridner, Department of History, jridner@history.msstate.edu, or Assistant Professor Hillary Richardson, MSU Libraries, HRichardson@library.msstate.edu.

Responsibilities:

Assisting with oral history interviews, partially transcribing and indexing oral history interviews, conducting archival research in MSU's Special Collections Department or online, doing other kinds of library research, and assisting in website revision (via Wordpress). Tasks will be adapted to suit the interests and experiences of the student.

Position Details:

Aside from having an interest in the subject matter, the ideal student for this project would be a good writer and researcher, and detail-oriented. Student would also have to be capable of working both independently and cooperatively with others. Would be a plus to have some audio-video editing or other kinds of digital humanities skills (like prior experience with Wordpress).

Faculty Contact:
Judith Ridner
Humanities House, room 204, 118 President's Circle West
(662) 325-3604
jridner@history.msstate.edu
A Finite Element Analysis of the Microgravity Effects on the Human Heart
Abstract:

The heart is considered to be one of the most vital organs in the human body and while on Earth a healthy heart is at its optimal function and structure. The operational efficiency of the heart is compromised during space travel due to the effects of microgravity, where gravity is near zero and weightlessness results. Researchers (Michel, Waligora, Horrigan & Shumate 1975) in the past have tested and determined from previous space mission data that space shuttle reentry has not “resulted in medically significant physiological stress” (Michel, Waligora, Horrigan & Shumate 136). The current research focus was to simulate reentry conditions of space shuttle missions and analyze the deleterious effects of microgravity on the heart. We studied methods of how the cardiac output and structure of the heart would be affected in microgravity conditions. We created a high fidelity meshed model of an astronaut’s heart, comprising of hexahedral and tetrahedral elements (number of elements) simulating microgravity conditions of the heart using the Abaqus/Explicit (Bateman 2014). Three major types of microgravity conditions were used to this end, which are the following: (a) gravity on Earth (baseline simulation), (b) gravity variation while being launched into space, and (c) gravity while in space. Our studies determined that the heart itself increases its cardiac output and heart rate in space, changes shape and structure, and becomes impaired upon return to Earth resulting in Orthostatic Intolerance (OI). Finally, the finite element analysis results of this research can help provide insight into the biomechanics of microgravity process from launch to space and then reentry.

Subject:
Poster, Biological Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...010300 - Ag & Bio Engineering
College of Arts & Sciences...031100 - Biological Sciences
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Rajkumar Prabhu
Agricultural Engineering Building
(662) 325-7351
pr66@msstate.edu
A Theologian of the Cross
Abstract:

For many, the defining moment of Martin Luther’s life was his nailing of the Ninety-Five Theses to the door of Wittenberg Castle Church. However, were it not for Luther’s previous conceptualization of his Theologia Crucis (Theology of the Cross) this historic moment would not have occurred. The Cross becomes the lens through which Luther interprets all theological thought. This paper therefore seeks to reveal the thoughts leading up to this declaration that “Crux sola nostra theologia (The Cross alone is our theology)” and the application to Luther’s doctrines of revelation and the “Hidden God” (McGrath 149-152). This essay establishes the connection between Luther’s fear and dread over the efficacy of his own works toward establishing righteousness before God and the ensuing peace which occurred after his realization that righteousness was a gift given from God rather than something established by man. This turn freed Luther from the fears of his own damnation and began him down the road that would lead to his stance against the sale of indulgences. The Cross becomes not only a lens for viewing theology but also the pinnacle of theology because it encapsulates every aspect of God’s revealed character and Christian doctrine. The evaluation of Luther’s understanding of the Cross through the lens of his personal struggles and doubts leads to a clearer picture of the establishment of his later theological principles. The analysis of Luther’s own understanding of the Cross also brings in to focus the ways in which modern Christian movements have accepted, rejected, or reinterpreted Luther’s position leading to a more pluralistic interpretation of the application of Christ and the Cross to the life of the believer.

Subject:
Talk, Arts and Humanities
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...033900 - English
College of Arts & Sciences...038100 - Philosophy & Religion
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Thomas Anderson
2002 Lee Hall
(662) 325-2522
tpa14@msstate.edu
Advancing Mississippi
Abstract:

University Research Center (URC) is hosting its second annual Advancing Mississippi Conference on Thursday, June 8, 2017 in Jackson. The student research paper competition is a unique opportunity for college students to contribute to making Mississippi’s future brighter for all citizens. Student research papers should address long-term economic challenges facing the state with policy recommendations. Economic challenges include any topic that could inhibit and/or enhance growth in the state including but not limited to education, health, criminal justice, family dynamics, and public policy. The committee has a strong preference for papers that display some originality and include some data analysis. Ideally, participation in this conference will give Mississippi’s students an outlet for their scholarship, while uncovering productive ways to overcome challenges and foster growth in the state.

Subject:
Call For Papers
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...038813 - A&S - African American Studies
College of Arts & Sciences...030300 - Anthropology
College of Arts & Sciences...032700 - Communication
College of Arts & Sciences...033900 - English
College of Arts & Sciences...035300 - History
College of Arts & Sciences...035400 - Inst For The Humanities
College of Arts & Sciences...038100 - Philosophy & Religion
College of Arts & Sciences...038500 - Political Science and Public Adm
College of Arts & Sciences...038600 - Psychology
College of Arts & Sciences...038901 - Social Work
College of Arts & Sciences...038900 - Sociology
College of Arts & Sciences...038200 - Stennis Institute
College of Business...048806 - Ctr for Entrepreneurship&Innovation
College of Business...040900 - Finance & Economics
College of Business...041800 - International Business Academic Prg
College of Business...041500 - Marketing/Quant Analysis/Bus Law
College of Education...053500 - Bureau of Educational Research
College of Education...054100 - Counseling, Ed Psyc, & Foundations
College of Education...051300 - Curriculum,Instruction & Special Ed
College of Education...051100 - Educational Leadership
College of Education...051500 - Educational Psychology
College of Education...053800 - Instructional Resource Center
College of Education...052300 - Instructional Syst & Workforce Devl
College of Education...211600 - T. K. Martin Center for Tech & Dis
College of Education...053600 - Writing/Thinking Institute
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Papers should be 15 pages or less. The students may submit their paper in the writing style of their choice (APA, MLA, etc.) as long as citations are clear and consistent. Papers that are coauthored by faulty members and/or professionals will not be considered. Group papers are allowed, however note that the book scholarships are per paper and not per author. Student papers should be submitted to scollins@mississippi.edu using “Student Paper Competition” in the subject line.

Responsibilities:

Student papers will be accepted through May 1, 2017. All students who submit papers will be invited to participate in our poster presentation session. This year we will have a separate competition for graduate and undergraduate students. The first place paper for each group will earn a $300 book scholarship. Each second place paper will earn a $200 book scholarship. The authors of all 4 papers will be given the opportunity to present their papers during the conference and have their papers published in The Mississippi Economic Review. The selection committee will announce the top 4 student papers by June 1, 2017. Papers should be 15 pages or less. The students may submit their paper in the writing style of their choice (APA, MLA, etc.) as long as citations are clear and consistent. Papers that are coauthored by faulty members and/or professionals will not be considered. Group papers are allowed, however note that the book scholarships are per paper and not per author. Student papers should be submitted to scollins@mississippi.edu using “Student Paper Competition” in the subject line. The presentations of student paper winners from last year’s conference can be found by clicking here and then scrolling to the bottom of the page. The Mississippi Economic Review is URC’s newest peer-reviewed journal. The aim of the journal is to publish articles that examine long term economic issues affecting the state. Although the journal is peer-reviewed, those who choose to participate in the student paper competition will have their papers reviewed by a URC committee instead.

Position Details:

For more information go to http://www.mississippi.edu/urc/downloads/call_for_student_papers.pdf .

Faculty Contact:
Scott Maynard
Montgomery Hall Room 300
(662) 325-3344
smaynard@career.msstate.edu
Agency and Selfhood in the Gaudiya Vaisnava Tradition
Abstract:

: I will present the issues of agency and selfhood from the point of view of the Hindu tradition known as Gaudiya Vaisnavism. This tradition was inspired by Caitanya Mahāprabhu, and it has been expanded upon by his followers, such as Jiva Gosvamin. The Gaudiya Vaisnava tradition is a devotional tradition in which devotion to God is seen as the path to liberation. The followers of Gaudiya Vaisnava believe that everyone, regardless of their individual circumstances in life, has the ability to achieve liberation through God. They revere the Bhāgavata Purāṇa as the most important scripture and the basis for their beliefs. They believe that the self (ātman) is conscious and possesses agency. The self is the agent, apprehender, and experiencer that expresses itself through the mind-body complex. The self is conscious but requires the body as it must be conscious of something. The ego (false self) is created by different types of mental fluctuations. There are five mental fluctuations (vrttis) that encompass all that the mind experiences. They are correct cognition, false cognition, memory, imagination, and deep sleep. The first four mental fluctuations are responsible for creating the ego of the material self (false self). Deep sleep is unique in that it is experienced when the mind is at an idle or inactive point (no dreaming or activity of any kind). They believe that this experience of deep sleep proves there is an inherent quality of the true self (ātman) that can generate experience and a sense of “I” that is unique from the material ego. The agency that the self is said to possess is not independent, but it derives from the Lord.

Subject:
Talk, Arts and Humanities
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...038100 - Philosophy & Religion
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Dr. Jonathan
Etheredge Hall, Rm 223D
jedelmann@philrel.msstate.edu
Analysis of a draft assembly of the timber rattlesnake (Crotulus horridus) genom
Abstract:

Snakes have undergone significant adaptions which have led to distinctive characteristics that are yet to be fully understood at the genomic level. Due to their extreme physiological characteristics, they act as useful model organisms for other vertebrates. The timber rattlesnake (Crotulus horridus) is of particular interest due to its potential as a model for hibernation physiology. The timber rattlesnake ranges throughout the eastern United States but parts of its habitat have become threatened. In this paper, a draft genome of the timber rattlesnake was examined for completeness and phylogenetic relationships were estimated. Coverage of the genome was calculated and CEGMA was used to understand the viability of the assembly. Phylogenetic trees were created using nuclear protein-coding gene sequences from the rattlesnake and other vertebrates, namely snakes.

Subject:
Poster Competition, Biological Sciences
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...031100 - Biological Sciences
393400 - Shackouls Honors College - Institute for Genomics, Biocomputing, and Biotechnology
Other - Institute for Genomics, Biocomputing, and Biotechnology
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
William Sanders
Pace Seed Lab, Rm 108
(662) 325-2839
wss2@igbb.msstate.edu
Analysis of Natural Crosslinkers on Porcine Cartilage
Abstract:

The development of osteochondral xenografts requires effective antigen removal. The use of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to eliminate DNA and cell residues thereby make the cartilage less immunogenic and also disrupts the extracellular matrix and decreases its mechanical properties. Collagen crosslinking can strengthen cartilage mechanically and aide in resistance to enzymatic degradation. In the present study, we are investigating the effects of the following natural crosslinkers selected because of their low cytotoxicity: Genipin (GP), Proanthocyanidin (PA), and Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG) and compared to the benchmark crosslinker, Glutaraldehyde. The disks were first decellularized using SDS according to a previously published procedure1. Then they were fixed in 0.25% GP, 0.25% PA, 0.25% EGCG, and 2.5% Glutaraldehyde for 24 hours at 37°C.The samples were subjected to confined compression tests to test the mechanical properties, and they were characterized biochemically for DNA and glycosaminoglycans (GAG). The samples are in the process of being tested for enzymatic resistance using collagenase. Swelling ratio will be calculated from wet weight and dry weight after freeze drying. Degree of crosslinking will be determined using the ninhydrin assay. All the tests were compared against native and SDS decellularized cartilage. The results thus far indicate that all methods result in a degree of crosslinking above 50% and cause negligible shrinkage in the radial direction. Pilot data suggest that all fixatives increase cartilage’s mechanical strength and its resistance to collagenase digestion. The results suggest that the natural crosslinkers are good alternatives to Glutaraldehyde. Further testing to examine the effect of crosslinking on chondrocyte behavior in vitro and to investigate the physiological response to crosslinked constructs in vivo is warranted. Reference: 1. Elder BD, Eleswarapu SV, Athanasiou KA. Extraction techniques for the decellularization of tissue engineered articular cartilage constructs. Biomaterials. 2009 Aug; 30(22):3749-56.

Subject:
Poster, Biological Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...010300 - Ag & Bio Engineering
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Dr. Steven El
Ag & Bio Engi Bldg., Rm 232
5-9107
selder@abe.msstate.edu
Applied Thermal Management and Energy Conversion with Heat Pipes
Abstract:

Oscillating heat pipes (OHPs) are two-phase heat transfer devices with ultra-high thermal conductivity used for high-power electronics thermal management. They typically exist as flat copper plates with a serpentine-arranged, capillary-sized channel engraved on their surface. Once the channel structure is engraved, the plate is hermetically sealed and filled with a working fluid (i.e. water or acetone). Within the Thermal Management and Energy Harvesting Laboratories (TherMEHL), ongoing research is being performed on conceptualizing and proving novel designs for increasing the heat transfer capability, as well as energy conversion efficiency, of OHPs. The research is highly experimental and challenges students to be creative in designing state-of-the-art features for heat transfer enhancement. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) may also be utilized to perform system-level modeling. Methods for flow control (e.g. Tesla valves, diffuser-type valves) for increasing the efficiency of heat pipes also are being investigated.

Subject:
Heat Transfer + Energy
College & Department:
College of Engineering...061700 - Mechanical Engineering
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Interested, motivated students can email Dr. Scott Thompson @ thompson@me.msstate.edu. Student should attach a brief summary of interest, as well as their resume (if available).

Responsibilities:

Project may include any of the below opportunities: - Assist graduate students with laboratory activities - Perform and design experiments - Design, fabricate and test novel heat transfer equipment - Computational fluid dynamics - Computer-aided drawing - Use of machine shop

Position Details:

Student will primarily work with Graduate Students involved on the project. Based on performance, the Student may become actively engaged in research meetings to discuss progress. Exceptional students will be considered for a funded research position (undergraduate or graduate).

Faculty Contact:
Scott Thompson
219 Carpenter Hall
(662) 325-1535
thompson@me.msstate.edu
Attachment Styles and Sex Motives
Abstract:

This study examined how adult attachment styles impacted motivations for having sexual intercourse. Previous research supports that the avoidant attachment style is positively correlated to manipulation and stress reduction motives for having sex (Davis, 2004) and that people with an anxious attachment style are more likely to have sex for reasons related to insecurity and a need for intimacy (Schachner, 2004). Data was collected using the Relationship Styles, Sex, and Condom Use study. Participants were recruited through the Psychology Research Program and received one hour of credit to be applied to their psychology course for participating in the study. The Adult Attachment Scale was used to assess attachment styles; the Affective and Motivational Orientation Related to Erotic Arousal Questionnaire (AMORE) was used to assess sex motives. The results of a Pearson’s Correlation found that individuals high in avoidance attachment were more likely to have sex to experience their partner’s power (r = 0.192, p = 0.000) than those high in anxiety attachment (r = 0.157, p = 0.001). Also, those high in anxiety attachment were more likely to have sex to nurture their partner (r = 0.172, p = 0.000), to experience pleasure (r = 0.169, p = 0.000), to procreate (r = 0.106, p = 0.027), and to value their partner (r = 0.183, p = 0.000) than those high in avoidance attachment. Future research should look at gender differences in attachment styles and how those differences influence motivations for having sexual intercourse.

Subject:
Poster, Social Sciences
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...038600 - Psychology
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Dr. Kristina
313 Magruder
5-7653
khood@psychology.msstate.edu
Avian embryology and physiology
Abstract:

Students have the opportunity to explore the effects of various incubational regimens and the in ovo (in egg) injection of various compounds on avian embryological development and physiology.

Subject:
Avian egg incubation, embryology, and in ovo injection
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...013100 - Poultry Science
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Call (662-325-3379) or e-mail (d.peebles@msstate.edu) Dr. E. David Peebles for information.

Responsibilities:

Handling and working with avian eggs and embryos, and working with incubation and in ovo injection equipment.

Position Details:

Hands-on work with avian eggs and embryos; data collection, entry and analysis; and report preparation.

Faculty Contact:
Edgar Peebles
Hill Poultry Sci Bldg, Rm 208
(662) 325-3379
d.peebles@msstate.edu
Building Material Stewardship and Sustainable Practices
Abstract:

Each year, the built environment and its associated industries account for nearly forty percent of all carbon emissions on the planet. Building materials and mechanical systems play an immense role in both the construction of a building and the continued sustenance of the building and its occupants, meaning that the building designers must consider the entire lifespan of a building, not just until construction is completed. Throughout history, man had built with what was mostly a static and balanced repertoire of materials, both raw and manufactured. In the last 130 years, through the industrialization and development of the world, those materials and their properties have changed dramatically, in many ways for the better. Yet over that passage of time, we have witnessed a rapid acceleration of the detriment of our natural environment, and because of the impact the built environment has on the natural environment, no longer can we ignore the irresponsibility that is exhibited by the building design and construction industries. New development in the industry shows a trend of improvement with regards to stewardship and sustainability, but much of this development seems to emerge from the mechanical equipment of a building rather than its raw or manufactured building materials. Innovation both within markets and across entire industries has the potential to connect and recycle resources, substantially improving the standing of the built environment in the eyes of the ecological. This research is designed to address the importance of material and resource stewardship that the building construction industry has so poignantly ignored until the last two decades, and invite a conversation to investigate potential pathways to a genuinely sustainable and innovative industry that can set a new standard from which other sectors can take inspiration.

Subject:
Poster Competition, Arts and Humanities
College & Department:
College of Arch, Art & Design...020100 - School of Architecture
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Jacob Gines
240 Giles Hall
(662) 325-0094
jag745@msstate.edu
C Spire - Nokia Bell Labs Fellowship
Abstract:

The C Spire – Nokia Bell Labs Fellowship program is a partnership among C Spire, Nokia Bell Labs and key Mississippi universities, providing an opportunity for top students to gain access to practicing engineers at C Spire and research leaders at Nokia Bell Labs. The students will be mentored by C Spire and Nokia Bell Labs experts as they pursue areas of interest at the universities that overlap with work being performed by their mentors at C Spire and Nokia Bell Labs. The expertise gained while at the university can be carried through after graduation to employment at C Spire, which will include a rotation at a Nokia Bell Labs facility. Key overlapping areas of interest across C Spire and Nokia Bell Labs are Massive Scale Access (which can include anything from 5G, ultra-small cells, and massive MIMO to spectrum sharing and internet of things), Universal Adaptive Core (addressing 5G core transformation, network virtualization, and slicing), and Dynamic Data Security.

Subject:
Engineering Fellowship
College & Department:
College of Engineering...032900 - Computer Science
College of Engineering...062900 - Computer Science and Engineering
College of Engineering...060700 - Electrical and Computer Engineering
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Go to http://www.cspire.com/fellowship to apply

Responsibilities:

Two leaders in technology are teaming up to offer a prestigious fellowship for students at Ole Miss and MSU. You’ll begin turning your education into a profession as you work on cutting edge projects and develop the skills necessary to make your mark in the world of telecommunications and technology. - See more at: http://www.cspire.com/cms/wireless/careers-belllabs/#/ Fellows receive valuable funding, mentorships, and experience to rise to the top of their fields. $2500 per semester stipend for living expenses during undergrad. Mentorships with experts at C Spire and Nokia Bell Labs Opportunity for permanent employment at C Spire after graduation If employed, 3-6 month all expenses paid rotation at Nokia Bell Labs - See more at: http://www.cspire.com/cms/wireless/careers-belllabs/#/

Position Details:

Requirements: Junior or Senior in good standing at the University of Mississippi or Mississippi State University Demonstrated interest in fields related to C Spire and Nokia Bell Labs Must maintain 3.0 GPA Enrolled full time in a Computer Science or Engineering, preferably Electrical or Computer Engineering. Resume, transcript and two letters of recommendation from professors or industry leaders required.* Selected students must have successful completion of joint interview process with C Spire and Nokia Bell Labs, as well as complete regular check-ins and special projects with C Spire and Nokia Bell Labs mentors.

Faculty Contact:
Scott Maynard
Montgomery Hall Room 300
(662) 325-3344
smaynard@career.msstate.edu
Characterization of Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Structural Color Applications
Abstract:

Engineering structurally colored materials that mimic biological color generation and are environmentally responsive is critical for developing materials for color change applications. Structural color is created by incoherent and/or coherent light scattering resulting from the 3D periodicity of the particles and/or plasmon resonance. To date, attempts to produce structurally colored materials have been limited in approach and application. By mimicking light-structure mechanisms used to generate structural colors in nature, the overall objective of this work is to design a material capable of color change in response to environmental stimuli. Core-shell nanoparticles (csNPs), comprised of a lipid core and a chitosan or a polylysine shell provide an ideal starting material for creating structural color. The specific goal of this project is to characterize and obtain homogeneous populations of lipid-chitosan and lipid-polylysine csNPs. Morphology, core diameter, shell size and thickness, surface potential, zeta potential, and trends in particle conductivity measurements were obtained for native and dielectrophoresis-treated csNPs. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) treatment is hypothesized to polarize the csNPs allowing the manipulation of the nanoparticles. Ongoing studies include DEP to obtain more homogeneous populations of nanoparticles. Future studies will involve electrokinetic approaches to assemble the csNPs into a 3D packed, periodic pattern to mimic structural color found in nature.

Subject:
Poster, Biological Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...010300 - Ag & Bio Engineering
393400 - Shackouls Honors College - Institute for Imaging & Analytical Technologies
Other - Institute for Imaging & Analytical Technologies
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Dr. Giselle Thi
19 Clay Lyle Bldg.
5-3485
giselle@i2at.msstate.edu
Characterization of the Fetuin-Calcium Binding Interaction
Abstract:

Patients with end stage renal disease are at a high risk of death via cardiovascular disease. One main issue that causes the onset of cardiovascular disease is the genesis of calcification in the arteries. The duration of dialysis and fetuin-A deficiency promote the development of vascular calcification. Fetuin-A is a protein known to have an inhibitory effect on vascular calcification by binding to calcium in the mineral buildup in calcified arteries. The benefits of fetuin-A make it a suitable drug that can be administered to treat vascular calcification. We are proposing a controlled release system to deliver fetuin-A to sites of calcification for effective treatment. For this study, we performed chemical characterization and observed the binding interactions of fetuin-A and calcium carbonate nanoparticles in simulated blood fluid (SBF) to better understand the fetuin-mineral complex formation. ATR-FTIR analysis of the fetuin-A protein positively identified the presence of the protein on the surface of the CaCO3 nanoparticles. This analysis was important because it has not been reported in previous literature and knowing what the chemical fingerprint of fetuin-A looks like will allow for its detection when fetuin-mineral complex samples are analyzed. UV-visible spectroscopy analysis and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were used to characterize the size of fetuin-A as well as its interaction with CaCO3 nanoparticles. TEM was also used to image the fetuin-mineral complexes. The results of this study mimic the binding mechanism and complex stability of the fetuin-mineral complex formed in fetuin-A deficient patients. DLS data suggest that the low fetuin-A concentrations prevent the complex from inhibiting CaCO3crystal growth. The large >1200 nm structures visualized from the TEM support this finding. These findings will provide the basis for future works which include developing the polymer for the controlled release system and observing fetuin-A’s interaction with calcified vascular smooth muscle cells.

Subject:
Talk, Biological Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...010300 - Ag & Bio Engineering
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Chartrisa Simps
123 Agricultural Engineering Bldg.
(662) 325-8279
cls893@msstate.edu
Characterizing mitochondrial morphology of S. cerevisiae mutants using mtGFP
Abstract:

Pcp1p is a multi-spanning transmembrane peptidase that localizes to the inner membrane of the mitochondria in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutations in the PCP1 gene have been shown to negatively impact cellular respiration due to defects in mitochondrial morphology and loss of mitochondrial DNA. As a peptidase, Pcp1p has been shown to be responsible for the processing of Mgm1p (mitochondrial genome maintenance), a protein involved in mitochondrial fusion based events. In the absence of functional Pcp1p, the balance between mitochondrial membrane fusion and fission is skewed towards fission, generating highly fragmented mitochondria. Recently, the lab has used a temperature sensitive screening method to isolate yeast strains with altered Pcp1p activity. These Pcp1p mutants have single amino acid changes that give rise to defects in substrate processing. To characterize the impact that these pcp1 mutations have on mitochondrial morphology, Gibson Assembly Cloning was used to generate a plasmid containing a gene that codes for GFP (green fluorescent protein) with a mitochondrial matrix-targeting signal (mtGFP) expressed under the constitutive GPD promoter. Using the bioluminescent properties of GFP, the mitochondrial morphology of each yeast strain will be observed by fluorescence microscopy and classified.

Subject:
Poster Competition - Shackouls Honors College
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...031100 - Biological Sciences
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Closed

Responsibilities:

Closed

Position Details:

Closed

Faculty Contact:
Donna Gordon
Harned Hall, Rm 222
(662) 325-9337
dg300@msstate.edu
Chemistry Research Intern
Abstract:

Headquartered in Cordova, TN, Stratas Foods is a 50/50 joint venture formed in October 2008 between ACH Food Companies and Archer Daniels Midland Company. Stratas Foods is built on the combined strengths and expertise of these two great parent companies, laid down over the course of over 200 years of combined experience. At Stratas Foods, we recognize that Great Ingredients Make Great Food. With our technical expertise, global sourcing, and production facilities across North America, Stratas Foods provides the customer service and product innovation you expect from the leader in edible oils. The Research, Development, and Innovation Center enables Stratas' team of scientists to develop, test, and prototype a wide range of innovative oil products in stateof-the-art labs and pilot plant facilities. Stratas Foods is committed to producing the highest quality food products at a competitive price, while providing industry-leading transportation, distribution, and customer service resources. The Employees and Management of Stratas Foods are dedicated to exceeding customer expectations, and have a vision of excellence that will drive the company to achieve even more in the future. The Stratas RDI team has an exciting opportunity for a talented intern. As an intern with Stratas Foods, you will not only work with and learn from industry professionals, but you will also share in the culture of accountability at Stratas Foods.

Subject:
Chemistry
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...031100 - Biological Sciences
College of Arts & Sciences...031900 - Chemistry
Organization - Stratas Foods
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Interested applicants should send resumes to HR@STRATASFOODS.COM or fax (901) 592-5827. Please put “Intern - Chemistry” as the subject heading. Visit our website at www.stratasfoods.com. For more information, please visit parent company websites: www.achfood.com and www.admworld.com.

Responsibilities:

Job Summary As an intern, key responsibilities will include the following: • Perform analysis on internally / externally generated shortening, margarine, and oils samples in support of product development programs. • Participate in development of lab procedures involved with traditional AOCS methods for the quantification / qualification of edible fats and oils. • Other projects as assigned. Hours and Compensation A typical work week is consists of forty hours and this position pays $15 per hour.

Position Details:

Candidate Profile The ideal candidate will have the following: • An individual who is at least a junior in a Bachelors program • A concentration in chemistry, biology, or life sciences program • Minimum GPA of 3.2 on a 4.0 scale • A hard working individual willing to dig to the bottom of every issue • “Hands on” mindset with strong attention to detail • Ability to work independently • Strong interpersonal skills with the desire to contribute towards team success • Proficient in Microsoft Office Excel, Word and PowerPoint • Summer housing in a reasonable proximity to the Memphis, TN area

Faculty Contact:
Scott Maynard
Montgomery Hall Room 300
(662) 325-3344
smaynard@career.msstate.edu
Comprehensive Tectonics: Technical Building Assemblies from the Ground to the Sky
Abstract:

The book "Comprehensive Tectonics: Technical Building Assemblies from the Ground to the Sky" aims to fill the gap between existing literature on building construction assemblies. Therefore, this text proposes a holistic approach to remedying the study of building construction assemblies, that is a “…comprehension of the parts of [buildings] as intimately interconnected and explicable only by reference to the whole.” First, this new text will discuss and demonstrate implications of this gap in the creation of architecture for readers learning building construction assemblies. Second, this book will review building construction assemblies as a whole, to help readers understand the connection and implication of architectural detailing decisions from the earth to the sky. Additionally, the book will provide assistance to readers by its ease of use, with legible keys, scales, and reference images. Information about why the architect chose certain materials will help readers create their own process for utilizing building construction assemblies. Other resources such as a database for images within the text and downloadable files accessible on mobile devices would be other appreciated and useful reader resources. The main objective is to give readers a more comprehensive guide to building construction assemblies to aid in the creation of well-designed and well-developed architecture through building construction assemblies. Students in this course will learn about comprehensive tectonics by helping the faculty member develop the technical drawings needed for the book.

Subject:
Building Construction Assemblies
College & Department:
College of Arch, Art & Design...020100 - School of Architecture
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

No more openings available

Responsibilities:

N/A

Position Details:

N/A

Faculty Contact:
Alexis Gregory
240 Giles Hall
(662) 325-0722
ag1201@msstate.edu
Computational Quantum Studies: Dragons and Computers
Abstract:

Quantum science is one of the next frontiers both in computing and in nano-devices for technological applications. The projects will involve writing and running programs. You will work on one of two different projects. *) Quantum computing (Matlab programming). You will write and run Matlab programs related to adiabatic quantum computers. You may be working on a D-Wave II computer, with access through either D-Wave, Inc or through the D-Wave computer at USRA/NASA/Google. These quantum computers have the potential to find solutions to NP problems, thereby offering a unique new computational resource for many different applications. *) Quantum dragons (Mathematica programming). You will write and run Mathematica programs related to quantum dragons. These are newly discovered nano-devices that can have zero electrical resistance, and also function as Field Effect Transistors (FETs). You will help discover new quantum dragons, graphically display quantum dragons, and learn enough quantum mechanics to obtain the the functioning characteristics of the quantum dragon FETs.

Subject:
Computational Science
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...038400 - Physics & Astronomy
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

E-mail Prof. Mark Novotny at man40@ra.msstate.edu . In your e-mail, please describe: *) Your programming background (classes and self-taught) --> Mathematica experience (if any) --> Matlat experience (if any) *) How many hours per week you might be interested in working *) Your expected graduation time-frame *) Your projected availability and desire for employment during 2015 summer *) Whether you are on work-study (not required, but a plus) *) Which physics classes you have taken/are taking (at least PH 2233 preferred, but not required) *) Which mathematics classes you have taken/are taking (Differential equations preferred but not required)

Responsibilities:

You will gain experience in programming related to computational science, in particular computational science related to quantum calculations. You would work on one of two projects. *) Quantum computing (Matlab programming). You will write and run Matlab programs related to adiabatic quantum computers. You may be working on a D-Wave II computer, with access through either D-Wave, Inc or through the D-Wave computer at USRA/NASA/Google. *) Quantum dragons (Mathematica programming). You will write and run Mathematica programs related to quantum dragons. These are newly discovered nano-devices that can have zero electrical resistance, and also function as Field Effect Transistors.

Position Details:

Position would be working at the High Performance Computational Collaboratory, under a National Science Foundation grant through the Center for Computational Sciences (CCS). Programming may be done both at CCS and remotely. One to three positions available. One to two positions available. Employment during the 2015 summer, and into the 2015-2016 academic year are possibilities.

Faculty Contact:
Mark Novotny
Hilbun Hall, Rm 125
(662) 325-2806
man40@ra.msstate.edu
CVM Research Projects
Abstract:

In addition to academic programs, MSU CVM also has a very active research program in both animal health and human health. Undergraduate students at MSU who are interested in gaining research experience in the biological sciences, especially in health-related specialties, can find very rewarding opportunities at the College of Veterinary Medicine. Our research faculty have served as mentors for undergraduate students from almost every college at MSU. MSU CVM has several areas of strength in research. These areas include infectious disease, translational research, toxicology and biomedical research, food safety and epidemiology, and aquatic animal health.

Subject:
CVM Research
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...010300 - Ag & Bio Engineering
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011500 - Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
College of Ag & Life Sciences...012000 - Food Sci Nutrition Hlth Promo
College of Ag & Life Sciences...012002 - Nutrition Education
College of Ag & Life Sciences...013100 - Poultry Science
College of Arts & Sciences...031100 - Biological Sciences
College of Forest Resources...080301 - Colg of Forest Res-Wlf & Fisheries
College of Forest Resources...088802 - FWRC - Research Support
College of Forest Resources...080300 - FWRC-Wildlife,Fisheries&Aquaculture
College of Veterinary Medicine...464600 - Biomedical Research Center
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

MSU students interested in conducting research in one of these areas or in other health-related research areas for humans or animals can contact the CVM Office of Research and Graduate Studies

Responsibilities:

Responsibilities vary with project

Position Details:

Infectious disease research MSU-CVM has historically had a very strong research program in infectious diseases, including bacterioloty, virology, immunology, and parasitology. Most of the infectious disease research relates to animal health, but there is a significant amount of research on human diseases as well. Some examples of infectious disease research at MSU CVM include: (1) Understanding the role of superantigens in Staphylococcus aureus infections; (2) Understanding the role of host-pathogen interactions in the virulence of Streptococcus pneumonia; (3) Determining viral molecules that mediate differences in host specificity for influenza viruses; (4) Determining the role of host enzymes in Shigella and Yersinia infections; (5) Determining mechanisms by which Listeria monocytogenes is able to survive in host immune cells, and (6) Developing new vaccines for bacteria causing disease in farm-raised catfish. Translational Biomedical Research The MSU CVM Translational Biomedical Research center (TBRc) was established in 2011 to develop and coordinate translational research efforts in the College by identifying and investigating natural, spontaneously-occurring, complex animal diseases that emulate human disease. The TBRc is currently investigating asthma, personalized cardiovascular medicine, immunosuppressive disease, diabetes, osteoarthritis, cancer, and aging. Food Safety and Epidemiology 089 20130201 tjtThese research topics range from the molecular level to population-based epidemiologic studies and from pre-harvest to post-harvest. CVM research on broilers has ranged from evaluation of risk factors associated with the occurrence of Salmonella and Campylobacter along the production and processing continuum, to the development of a system dynamics model of the immersion chill tank in the processing plant, to understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in attachment and invasion of Salmonella to skin and intestinal cells, respectively. Food safety research in cattle focuses on prevalence of shigatoxin producing Escherichia coli serotypes in cattle populations and in feedlot runoff. Other research work is directed towards Listeria monocytogenes effects in catfish and poultry. Several faculty with expertise in epidemiology and preventive veterinary medicine participate in the Risk Project at MSU, an affiliation of faculty interested in applying risk-based strategies to solve everyday problems in animal agriculture and include work on the development of an efficient cattle health and production record keeping system, causes and determinants of pneumonia in pre-weaned beef cattle, stocker cattle receiving programs, and assessing risk factors associated with the occurrence of diseases in poultry, among others. Toxicology and Biomedical Research (Center for Environmental Health Sciences) The Center for Environmental Health Sciences (CEHS) is a multi-disciplinary research center housed in the CVM that focuses on the impact of environmental chemicals on the health of humans, animals, and the environment. Eleven CVM faculty participate in Center activities. The goal of the research is to determine which environmental chemicals do or do not pose a threat to health, with a primary focus on human health. Main areas of research interest are neurotoxicology, endocrine disruption, immunotoxicology, and health disparities. Aquatic Animal Health (Global Center for Aquatic Food Security) Channel catfish aquaculture is the largest aquaculture industry in the U.S. in terms of acreage, production, and dollar value. MSU-CVM has a very strong concentration of faculty expertise in aquatic animal health, including research in bacteriology, virology, immunology, parasitology, and toxicology, particularly in warmwater aquaculture. In 2013, MSU formed the Global Center for Aquatic Food Security to stimulate interaction and collaboration among MSU faculty in aquatic animal health, aquaculture, and fisheries for development of scholarly activity, education of students, and submission of grant proposals. The GCAFS will collaborate also with the UN Food and Agriculture Organization to promote and engage MSU faculty in aquatic animal health, aquaculture, and fisheries in international activities in developing countries. These international activities will address sustainable aquaculture to reduce world hunger through capacity building, aquatic diagnostics, and investigative research.

Faculty Contact:
Scott Maynard
Montgomery Hall Room 300
(662) 325-3344
smaynard@career.msstate.edu
Development of biobased adhesive
Abstract:

In this project the undergraduate student will have the opportunity to work with my two PhD students and research associate in the lab. She/he will learn how to measure the physical, chemical and thermal properties of biopolymers, formulate adhesive and evaluate the performance of developed engineered wood products. This is a great opportunity for student with chemistry or chemical engineering background to learn a number of advanced analytical techniques for polymer characterization.

Subject:
Polymer chemistry, wood science
College & Department:
College of Forest Resources...080500 - FWRC - Forest Products
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Please send your CV to Dr. Mojgan Nejad at m.nejad@msstate.edu.

Responsibilities:

Working with PhD students in the lab, preparing and analyzing lignin and resin samples.

Position Details:

Students with either chemistry or chemical engineering background are encouraged to apply.

Faculty Contact:
Mojgan Nejad
201 Locksley Way
(662) 325-2381
m.nejad@msstate.edu
Development of pH- Responsive Polymer-Magnetic Nanocomposite Surfaces
Abstract:

Stimuli-responsive polymers (SRP) can expand/collapse due to rearrangements into different conformations in response to the local physicochemical environment. SRP brushes tethered to a substrate are called “smart surfaces” due to their responses to external stimulus; the underlying substrates can be flat wafers, membranes, microfluidic-devices and many other substances depending on the application. The purpose of this project was to synthesize and examine the structure-property relationships of ‘smart’ surfaces comprised of a surface-grafted pH responsive poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) brush and amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles. By using different characterization techniques, this work targeted to confirm the design of ‘smart’€™ surfaces which could be used for potential applications such as bacterial growth inhibition or heavy metals removals. Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) is a controlled radical polymerization utilized for surface-confined polymerizations, and was used in this study. Gold substrates were reacted with bromine-based initiator (Au-Br) to allow for the surface-confined polymerization of poly(methacrylic acid) PMAA. A bromine initiator was produced, and then ATRP of methacrylic acid performed to produce a PMAA tethered polymer brush grafted on the Au surface under different mixing conditions. Finally, amine functionalized magnetic nano-particles were attached to the PMAA brushes. Once ‘smart’ surfaces combining amine-functionalized nanoparticles and pH-responsive PMAA polymer brushes were synthesized, in-situ ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy measurements were used to evaluate the response of the smart surfaces at different pH conditions. This project helped to understand the swelling ratio due to different pH conditions of diverse polymer brushes. In the future, this work will also help to comprehend the charge dependence due to salt interaction of polymer brushes by performing in-situ characterization techniques with different ionic strengths and salt types.

Subject:
Poster Competition - Shackouls Honors College
College & Department:
College of Engineering...060300 - Chemical Engineering
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Closed

Responsibilities:

Closed

Position Details:

Closed

Faculty Contact:
Dr. Kesha Walte
330 Swalm Chemical Engineering
662-325-2480
kwalters@che.msstate.edu
Domestic Nuclear Detection
Abstract:

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) Summer Internship Program provides opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to participate in projects at federal research facilities located across the country focused on helping DNDO meet its mission of “implementing domestic nuclear detection efforts for a managed and coordinated response to radiological and nuclear threats, as well as integration of federal nuclear forensics programs.” This program will prepare a diverse, highly talented, educated, and skilled pool of scientists and engineers to address issues related to national security and nuclear detection and to enhance the future scientific and technical workforce to be both knowledgeable and trained in fields of specific interest to DNDO. Undergraduate students receive a stipend of $600 per week for ten weeks plus travel expenses. Graduate students receive a stipend of $700 per week for ten weeks plus travel expenses. Research experiences are offered at: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley, CA) ● Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore, CA) ● Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos, NM) ● National Security Technologies – Remote Sensing Laboratory (Los Vegas, NV and Andrews AFB, MD) ● Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (Richland, WA) Areas of research: Engineering, computer science, mathematics, physics, chemistry, environmental science, and more. U.S. citizenship required

Subject:
Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) Summer Internship P
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...038812 - A&S Math Domain
College of Arts & Sciences...031900 - Chemistry
College of Arts & Sciences...036900 - Mathematics & Statistics
College of Arts & Sciences...038400 - Physics & Astronomy
College of Engineering...060100 - Aerospace Engineering
College of Engineering...010300 - Agricultural and Biological Engineering
College of Engineering...060300 - Chemical Engineering
College of Engineering...060500 - Civil and Environmental Engineering
College of Engineering...032900 - Computer Science
College of Engineering...062900 - Computer Science and Engineering
College of Engineering...060700 - Electrical and Computer Engineering
College of Engineering...061300 - Industrial and Systems Engineering
College of Engineering...061700 - Mechanical Engineering
College of Engineering...062100 - Petroleum Engineering
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

How to Apply: Applications and supporting materials must be submitted at https://www.zintellect.com/Posting/Details/2828

Responsibilities:

See Above

Position Details:

Program Information: Detailed information about the internships can be found at http://orau.gov/dndo/ For questions please email us at dhsed@orau.org.

Faculty Contact:
Scott Maynard
Montgomery Hall Room 300
(662) 325-3344
smaynard@career.msstate.edu
Eakin Memory and Metamemory (M&M) Lab
Abstract:

Research in the Memory and Metamemory Lab focuses on "memory gone wrong" topics, such as false memories, failures of eyewitness memory, retrieval errors, and forgetting. We also investigate what you know about your own memory abilities, such as whether you have studied enough to remember information on a future test, and how confident you are in the answers you retrieve.

Subject:
Research Assistant in Cognitive Psychology
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...038600 - Psychology
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Contact Dr. Deborah K. Eakin at deakin@psychology.msstate.edu for an application! Remember, the last day to add for Fall is Monday, August 24th!

Responsibilities:

You will assist in experimental protocols, including design, data collection, data processing, and analysis.

Position Details:

You will work on a variety of tasks in the lab and work closely with the graduate students on their research. Weekly meetings will be held with Dr. Eakin to discuss motivation for the studies, results, and to train on procedures. BONUS!!: You will have access to all of the plain and peanut M&Ms you can eat! Opportunities are there for you to do independent research as your skills mature.

Faculty Contact:
Deborah Eakin
Magruder Hall, Room 214
(662) 325-7949
de115@msstate.edu
Effect of Plant-Derived Cannabinoids on IgM and IgG Production
Abstract:

The marijuana plant, also known as Cannabis sativa, contains over 60 cannabinoid compounds. The three best-characterized compounds, Δ9- tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), and cannabinol (CBN), have distinct pharmacology. In the body, there are two cannabinoid receptors, CB1and CB2. CB1 is predominantly found in the central nervous system while CB2 is predominantly found in B cells of the immune system. THC binds to both CB1and CB2, producing a psychotropic “high”. CBD has low affinity for both CB1 and CB2, and CBN binds to CB2 but has a low affinity for CB1. Because of the potential uses of cannabinoids as medicines, it is important to characterize the effects on the body. Thus, the following hypothesis will be tested: Cannabinoid compounds will inhibit the production of both IgG and IgM from B cells. The goals of this project are to compare different cannabinoid compounds and their effects on IgM and IgG using both flow cytometry and ELISAs. Inhibition of IgM and IgG was tested by treating mouse splenocytes with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for various times, followed by assessment of secreted antibody by ELISA and/or intracellular antibody production by flow cytometry. LPS-stimulated IgM secretion is inhibited by CBD, especially at higher LPS concentrations. Over time, CBD and THC significantly inhibit intracellular IgM and have a modest effect on intracellular IgG. The results from these studies demonstrate that cannabinoids directly affect B cells. Cannabinoids seem to preferentially suppress IgM, and CBD’s effect may depend on the degree to which B cells are activated.

Subject:
Poster Competition - Biological Sciences and Engineering
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011300 - Animal & Dairy Science
College of Veterinary Medicine...182010 - CVM Basic Science Dept Admin
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

No positions are currently available for this project.

Responsibilities:

No positions are currently available for this project.

Position Details:

No positions are currently available for this project.

Faculty Contact:
Barbara Kaplan
Wise Center
(662) 325-1130
blk144@msstate.edu
Effect of Social Media Advertising on Student Attendance at Events
Abstract:

This study will examine the effect of social media advertising and its effect on student participation at events. The goal is to determine which media is the most effective in getting timely information to students that generates an action on the students behalf.

Subject:
Social Media
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...032700 - Communication
Other - The Career Center
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Drop by the Career Center, 300 Montgomery Hall

Responsibilities:

Students will work with Event Coordinator to survey attendees at events and compile data for analysis.

Position Details:

Hours will vary with event schedules.

Faculty Contact:
Scott Maynard
Montgomery Hall Room 300
(662) 325-3344
smaynard@career.msstate.edu
Elevating Habitat: Service-Learning in Design and Construction
Abstract:

Organizations such as Architecture for Humanity, Architects Without Borders and other non-profit architecture design organizations are interested in service-learning to aid those throughout the world that have been affected by poverty, war and natural disasters. The students working on this research worked with the Starkville Area Habitat for Humanity to design the upcoming Maroon Edition 2013 house to be constructed in the fall semester of 2013. The class was composed of students from the School of Architecture and the Department of Building Construction Science. Students met and worked directly with the future homeowners for the house in addition to members of the Starkville Habitat for Humanity board. The research studied the effects of service-learning on Millennial students working on architecture design and construction. The students worked as a team to design the house, as well as create the construction drawings that will be needed to order materials and construct the house. Students developed critical professional skills in addition to the design skills inherent in architecture education. These include the ability to utilize modular materials for construction detailing to limit the expense of the house construction, the ability to complete a construction budget estimate to help provide guidance on the expense of the construction of the student design, and the ability to complete a construction schedule for the project to understand the time implications of design for a non-profit client. The service-learning aspect of the research exposed students to a new way of learning and looking at an architectural design and construction project. They were able to partner with a real-world client, not just imagine how to work with them. This helped the students better understand the needs of their client, and the community. A more developed sense of the effects of architecture as service was achieved through the student research.

Subject:
Service-Learning in Architecture and Construction
College & Department:
College of Arch, Art & Design...020100 - School of Architecture
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Project has completed

Responsibilities:

N/A

Position Details:

N/A

Faculty Contact:
Alexis Gregory
240 Giles Hall
(662) 325-0722
ag1201@msstate.edu
evaluation of climate in the past by using chemical records in rocks
Abstract:

The importance of climate proxies in understanding the extent of the environmental challenge that faces us cannot be overstated. However, the reliability of these records is entirely dependent on the soundness of the foundation on which they're constructed. The focus of my research is to understand the fundamental controls on elemental and isotope partitioning between minerals and fluid, to use that knowledge to better interpret current geochemical proxies, and to identify and develop new proxies for reconstructing paleoenvironment.

Subject:
oceanography, paleoclimatology, geochemistry
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...034900 - Geosciences
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

email me at rinat.gabitov@gmail.com

Responsibilities:

Responsibilities will be discussed. Examples include: Assisting in sample preparation or performing of experiments

Position Details:

Examples of tasks include: Weighting small amounts of rocks samples, Polishing of small rock fragments ...

Faculty Contact:
Rinat Gabitov
109 Hilbun Hall
(662) 268-1032
rinat.gabitov@gmail.com
Evolution of the MYB gene family of transcription factors
Abstract:

The MYB protein family is a group of transcription factors that regulates the expression of several target genes. Studies based on mouse identified one member of the MYB family, A-MYB, as one of the major transcription factors regulating the expression of PIWI interacting (piRNA) clusters. These clusters act as the source of piRNAs, a class of small RNAs involved in protecting genome integrity by repressing the activity of transposable elements. At present, there is great interest in elucidating how piRNAs are regulated, expressed, and processed. A reconstruction of the evolutionary history of the MYB family can shed light on when the association between A-MYB and piRNA clusters emerged. To do this we first queried MYB nucleotide sequences from both vertebrate and invertebrate genomes, and reconstructed the evolutionary history using phylogentic methods. With a few notable exceptions, MYBs were generally absent from invertebrate genomes. Interestingly, the expansion of the MYB family is notable in the early stages of vertebrate evolution: The presence of three MYB paralogs, A-MYB, B-MYB and C-MYB maps to the early branches of the vertebrate tree. Although the trees would suggest the duplications giving rise to these genes are shared between cyclostomes and gnathostomes, the former have lost traces of A-MYB. Our results would indicate that the involvement of A-MYB in regulating the expression of piRNA clusters might trace back to the common ancestor of teleost fish and tetrapods, approximately 400 million years ago.

Subject:
Poster, Biological Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011900 - Biochem,MolBio,Entmology&Plant Path
College of Arts & Sciences...031100 - Biological Sciences
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Federico Hoffma
Dorman Hall, Rm 443
(662) 325-2763
fgh19@msstate.edu
Experimental Evaluation of Backoff Algorithms
Abstract:

Standard binary exponential backoff is a ubiquitous algorithm for sharing a common constrained resource (such as a wireless channel) among multiple devices. However, despite its widespread deployment, the performance guarantees of backoff are poor. In particular, throughput can suffer greatly under bursty requests for channel access and there are no guarantees in the face of malicious interference. A recent result at SODA'16 proposes a solution to this problem that comes with provable guarantees on throughput. While this is promising, no experimental evaluation of this idea has yet been performed. This project aims to provide a detailed evaluation of backoff and several theoretical variants to investigate the circumstances (if any) under which this protocol performs poorly and to what degree. Time permitting, we will also translate the algorithmic result from SODA'16 into a protocol and test its performance. This is a challenging and open-ended research project for highly-motivated students with a solid background in C++ programming, computer networks, and algorithms.

Subject:
Implementation, programming, algorithms, evaluation
College & Department:
College of Engineering...062900 - Computer Science and Engineering
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

If you are a motivated student interested in this work, please send me your cover letter and CV by email (my325@msstate.edu). Additionally, specify your grades for relevant coursework such as algorithms, networks, and programming (C++ and Python) courses.

Responsibilities:

As a first step, you will be responsible for learning how to design and implement basic experiments with Network Simulator 3 (NS3). Since I am not familiar with NS3, I expect this to be a learning process for both of us, but you will become the teacher on this topic. Ideally, the candidate should understand the basics of computer networks and be comfortable with C++ programming (and Python, if possible). We will then decide on which experiments to run using standard binary exponential backoff. This will likely involve exploring a number of network scenarios in order to understand where this protocol's performance suffers. Given the above is achieved, we will work together to specify a barebones protocol from the algorithmic result of SODA'16. Algorithms are often far from finished products and a significant amount of work is typically required to transform a theoretical result into something practical. I expect this will require some adaptation of the algorithm, and this will be a collaborative endeavor; here, a basic understanding of algorithms is desired. Throughout the duration of this project, we will meet at least once per week in order to evaluate progress.

Position Details:

The duration of this position is flexible based on how much progress we make and the constraints of the student. The student should be available to work for at least 2 months, but funding is available for up to 4 months if we are making progress. Based on exceptional performance, the student will be considered for research position that is funded over a longer period of time (undergraduate or graduate).

Faculty Contact:
Maxwell Young
300 Butler Hall
(662) 325-2756
my325@msstate.edu
Exposing Gaps in Student Literature for Building Construction Technologies
Abstract:

LEARNING BUILDING CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGIES (ALSO KNOWN AS BUILDING ASSEMBLAGES) IS PARAMOUNT TO COMPREHENDING THE PHYSICAL AND, OFTEN TIMES, EXPERIENTIAL COMPONENTS OF ARCHITECTURE. ACCREDITED ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTIONS ACROSS THE COUNTRY, INCLUDING MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY, REQUIRE STUDENTS TO “DEMONSTRATE PRINCIPLES OF STRUCTURAL BEHAVIOR IN WITHSTANDING GRAVITY AND LATERAL FORCES AND THE EVOLUTION, RANGE, AND APPROPRIATE APPLICATION OF CONTEMPORARY STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS [AS WELL AS] ILLUSTRATE...PRINCIPLES INVOLVED IN THE APPROPRIATE APPLICATION OF BUILDING ENVELOPE SYSTEMS AND ASSOCIATED ASSEMBLIES RELATIVE TO FUNDAMENTAL PERFORMANCE, AESTHETICS, MOISTURE TRANSFER, DURABILITY, AND ENERGY AND MATERIAL RESOURCES.”  FURTHERMORE, STUDENTS MUST LEARN TO ADJUST BUILDING ASSEMBLIES TO “OPTIMIZE, CONSERVE, OR REUSE NATURAL AND BUILT RESOURCES, PROVIDE HEALTHFUL ENVIRONMENTS FOR OCCUPANTS/USERS, AND REDUCE THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATIONS ON FUTURE GENERATIONS THROUGH MEANS SUCH AS CARBON-NEUTRAL DESIGN, BIOCLIMATIC DESIGN, AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY. (NAAB ONLINE)” TEXTBOOKS AND MANUALS MUST BEGIN TO PROVIDE A HOLISTIC UNDERSTANDING OF THESE COMPONENTS OF BUILDING ASSEMBLAGES AND THE PROCESSES FOR CHOOSING THEM, FOR NOT ONLY IS A COMPREHENSIVE UNDERSTANDING NECESSARY TO ACCREDITATION BUT ALSO IN CHALLENGING CONVENTIONAL TECHNIQUES, THE LATTER OF WHICH IS IMPERATIVE IN REACHING THE 2030 CHALLENGE (ALL BUILDINGS CARBON NEUTRAL BY 2030). THE STUDY OUTLINED IN THIS RESEARCH PROJECT LOOKS AT CURRENT STUDENT TEXTS FOR LEARNING BUILDING CONSTRUCTION ACROSS THE UNITED STATES TO ASCERTAIN WHETHER OR NOT ANY GAPS IN INFORMATION PERSISTS, WHICH COULD LEAD TO A LACK OF FULFILLMENT IN SCHOLARLY AND PROFESSIONAL PURSUITS OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION AND A SHALLOW FOCUS ON EMERGING ARCHITECTURL TECNIQUES LIKE DIGITAL FABRICATION AND SUSTAINABLE DESIGN. CRITERIA SUCH AS DRAWING TYPE, GRAPHIC REPRESENTAION, ORGANIZATIONAL TECHNIQUES, SCALE AND SIZE OF DRAWINGS, AND THE AVAILABILITY OF PRECEDENTS WERE ALL TAKEN INTO CONSIDERATION.

Subject:
Poster Competition, Arts and Humanities
College & Department:
College of Arch, Art & Design...020106 - Building Construction Science
College of Arch, Art & Design...020100 - School of Architecture
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Closed

Responsibilities:

Closed

Position Details:

Closed

Faculty Contact:
Alexis Gregory
240 Giles Hall
(662) 325-0722
ag1201@msstate.edu
Extension Agents' Perceptions of Changing Roles
Abstract:

Extension is a main component of Mississippi State University’s mission and is a vital part of the enhancement and support for Mississippi agriculture, communities, and youth. Extension agents are key in carrying out the programs and initiatives throughout the state. The purpose of this study was to explore MSU Extension agents’ perceptions of the new staffing plan and the resulting changes to their job responsibilities. Two research questions guided the study; what are the perceptions of Mississippi Extension agents toward the new staffing plan and what are the perceptions of Mississippi Extension agents toward their new job responsibilities. Nine county-level Extension agents were purposively selected for interviews. Phone and face-to-face interviews were conducted to investigate agents’ thoughts and feelings toward the new plan and the changes to their job responsibilities. Preliminary findings include several themes. For RQ1 the emerging themes are: acceptance without question, need for 4-H agent in each county, and focus on the county. Themes for RQ2 include: no change in responsibilities and need for guidance. Several conclusions can be made from the findings. The Extension agents interviewed expressed their support of the new plan, but were using it more as a guideline than as a strict mandate. Agents’ interpretations of their job responsibilities differed resulting in inconsistences in the ways the counties function, despite having a staffing plan and prescribed job responsibilities. Future research should be conducted to investigate the effects of shared 4-H responsibilities on program participation, effect on community development responsibilities, effect of the new staffing plan on work-life balance, and the impact of job performance of county coordinators. Recommendations for practice include increasing the number of Extension professionals in each office, hiring a regional director to offer county-level support, more effective evaluations, and inservice training to enhance the implementation of the staffing plan.

Subject:
Poster Competition, Social Sciences
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...010700 - Ag Information Science & Education
College of Ag & Life Sciences...012100 - School of Human Sciences
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
016300 - MSU Extension Service -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Closed

Responsibilities:

Closed

Position Details:

Closed

Faculty Contact:
Gaea Hock
215 Lloyd Ricks Watson Building
325-7834
gaea.hock@msstate.edu
Functional Epigenomics and Evolutionary Diversification of Mammalian Sperm and B
Abstract:

Fertilization of the egg by the spermatozoon sets the stage for embryogenesis and further development. Although epigenetics is known be correlated to embryo survival rate and fertility for both maternal and paternal factors, precise molecular, cellular, and physiological mechanisms regulating syngamy and maternal recognition of pregnancy, and fetal development are largely unknown. These gaps in the knowledge base are preventing advances in the science of early mammalian development and predicting and improving fertility. The objectives of this study were to unravel comparative structural dynamics of sperm from bull and Monodelphis domestica, and to ascertain functional epigenetic networks expressed in blastocyst stage embryos of mouse, human and cattle. To accomplish these objectives we used the networking tools MetaCore and AmiGO to examine the expressed epigenome, focusing on DNMT3L, BMI1, and L-selectin to further explore blastocyst epigenetic regulation by DNA methylation and chromatin remodeling, and embryonic adhesion to the mother, respectively. Sperm structure and motility were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and ImageJ, and computer-assisted sperm analysis respectively. The results generated so far showed that regulation of the blastocyst epigenome is strongly correlated to regulation of genes required for maternal-embryonic interactions. It was also revealed that the sequences of these genes are highly conserved between cattle, mice, and humans. The findings are significant because advances in the science of epigenome regulating early mammalian development can be used to improve assisted reproductive technologies infertility. Acknowledgements: This study was funded in part by the National Science Foundation DBI-1262901 REU Site: Undergraduate Research in Computational Biology at Mississippi State University, and by Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station.

Subject:
Poster, Biological Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011300 - Animal & Dairy Science
College of Arts & Sciences...031100 - Biological Sciences
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Erdogan Memili
Wise Center, Rm 4025
(662) 325-2937
em149@ads.msstate.edu
Genetic diversity and herbicide resistance mechanism of Echinochloa accessions from Mississippi
Abstract:

Echinochloa spp is one of the most troublesome weed of soybean and rice in Mississippi. There are numerous ecotypes that have evolved having differential tolerance to herbicides, thus further complicating weed management practices. The candidate will conduct experiments on various Echinochloa accessions collected across Mississippi, so as to determine the molecular mechanism of resistance to various herbicide modes of action. Activities may include herbicide response bioassays, enzyme activity assays, herbicide translocation and metabolism within the plant, DNA extraction, PCR, cloning, gene sequencing, transcriptomic, and DNA fingerprinting using SSR/SNP markers. The student will also get hands-on experience on how to analyze data obtained from the above experiments.

Subject:
Herbicide resistant weeds and weed physiology
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011100 - Plant and Soil Sciences
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Please contact Dr. Te-Ming Paul Tseng at 662-325-4725 or t.tseng@msstate.edu if you are interested or want to learn more about this project

Responsibilities:

...

Position Details:

...

Faculty Contact:
Te-Ming Paul Ts
Dorman Hall
(662) 325-2311
t.tseng@msstate.edu
Gold Nanoparticle Dissolution and Ligand Desorption Induced by Iodide
Abstract:

With their useful optical, electrical, and chemical properties, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have found many applications including biosensing, drug delivery, and solar energy harvesting. Self-assembly of organothiols or thiolated biomolecules is a common strategy to improve the AuNP dispersion stability, target specificity, and biocompatibility. Represented in this is our finding that iodide induces AuNP dissolution and ligand (including organothiols) desorption. The effect of varying ligand types, KI concentration, and ambient oxygen on the AuNP dissolution and ligand desorption is studied using a series of analytical techniques such as UV-vis and Raman spectroscopy and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry. Iodine is likely a critical reaction intermediate that is involved in both the AuNP dissolution and ligand desorption processes. This work is important for the fundamental understanding of the AuNP interfacial interactions.

Subject:
Talk, Physical Sciences and Engineering
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...031900 - Chemistry
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Dongmao Zhang
1115 Hand Laboratory
(662) 325-6752
dz33@msstate.edu
Grandfamilies Lab
Abstract:

Dr. Danielle's Nadorff's Grandfamilies Lab is looking for one or two well-qualified students to work in the lab as research assistants for the upcoming Fall 2016 semester. Students would receive three credits of PSY 4000 for this experience, which can be used as one of the six required upper-level electives for a Psychology degree. Nine hours of work within the lab are required per week. The benefits of being a research assistant include class credit, opportunities to practice valuable research skills, possible presentation or publication opportunities, and reference letters for graduate school or future careers. Dr. Nadorff is especially interested in students who wish to pursue a degree in Clinical Psychology upon graduation, and/or students enrolled in the Shackhoul's Honor College. "Grandfamilies" are households where the grandparents have a primary role in raising their grandchildren. There are approximately 100,000 grandchildren living with grandparent householders in the state of Mississippi, alone! Dr. Nadorff’s Grandfamilies Lab examines the social, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral outcomes for these “custodial grandchildren,” as well as examining how they compare to children raised in foster care. You may read more about the lab at http://www.grandfamilieslab.com.

Subject:
Looking for 1 or 2 research lab students for Fall 16
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...038800 - College of Arts & Sciences
College of Arts & Sciences...038600 - Psychology
393400 - Shackouls Honors College - Department of Psychology
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Contact Dr. Nadorff at Danielle.Nadorff@msstate.edu, to receive an application for joining the lab.

Responsibilities:

Lab responsibilities will vary, but may include data entry, literature reviews, recruitment and/or interviews of participants, study design, statistical analysis, and opportunities for presentations or manuscripts, both of which are highly recommended for graduate school. Thus, enrolling in a research lab is highly recommended for those who are planning on pursuing a Ph.D. in Psychology. Nine hours of work within the lab each week are required, in exchange for the three credits of PSY 4000.

Position Details:

Lab responsibilities will vary, but may include data entry, literature reviews, recruitment and/or interviews of participants, study design, statistical analysis, and opportunities for presentations or manuscripts, both of which are highly recommended for graduate school. Thus, enrolling in a research lab is highly recommended for those who are planning on pursuing a Ph.D. in Psychology. Nine hours of work within the lab each week are required, in exchange for the three credits of PSY 4000.

Faculty Contact:
Danielle Nadorf
208 Magruder Hall
6623253202
Danielle.Nadorff@msstate.edu
HIV/AIDS Knowledge and Behavior among College Students
Abstract:

As the HIV/AIDS pandemic enters its third decade the literature is replete with articles and books addressing the illness. Few, if any, illnesses have experienced this level of intense and sustained attention from social sciences, epidemiology, and popular media. An abundance of time, effort, and money fund HIV/AIDS education in order to prevent new infections. Yet new infections continue. Despite the attention HIV/AIDS has received, the question remains, “Are these education efforts effective?” This presentation focuses on research conducted among college students in Mississippi to understand what they know about HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, services, and where students learned this information.

Subject:
HIV/AIDS cultural knowledge
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...030300 - Anthropology
College of Arts & Sciences...030200 - Anthropology/Middle Eastern Culture
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Contact Dr. Toni Copeland via email (tc657@msstate.edu) to express interest in the project. We will schedule a meeting with either Dr. Copeland or another student on the project.

Responsibilities:

Students involved in this project must be IRB human subject certified. They must also learn the specific quantitative methods employed, specifically cultural consensus analysis and consonance. Students will participate in interviewing, data coding, analysis, and preparation of presentations. They will also help with literature searches and editing.

Position Details:

Contact Dr. Copeland for more information or to schedule a time to meet with another student currently involved with the project.

Faculty Contact:
Toni Copeland
Cobb Institute Bldg.
(662) 325-7523
tc657@msstate.edu
How Shear Thickening Fluids' Behavior is affected by Combining Particle Sha
Abstract:

This work will expand the student’s research into novel shear thickening fluids (STFs), which consist of a dispersed particulate phase suspended in a continuous liquid phase, wherein the student will investigate the rheological behavior of STFs with combined dispersed phases of varying shapes and aspect ratios. STFs stand apart from other suspensions due to their remarkable shear rate dependent behavior. Beyond a critical shear rate their apparent viscosity increases rapidly and often by several orders of magnitude, and this response is reversible upon cessation of shear. This behavior can be seen in Fig.1 which shows the average viscosity-shear rate curve for a 0.15 mass fraction Aerosil 200 fumed silica (A200) in 200 molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG 200) STF produced and characterized by the student using a shear rheomoeter with parallel plate fixtures. The error bars represent one standard deviation from three experiments above and below the average value. Images of the sample at key points during the experiments are inset in Figure 1. Figure1. Viscosity vs shear rate for 0.15 mass fraction Aerosil 200 in 200 molecular weight polyethylene glycol sample with images of sample during key points of a steady flow experiment Figure2. Two MMOD shielding specimens, honeycomb core filled with 0.3 MF Aerosil 200 fumed silica in 200 molecular weight polyethylene glycol STF and impacted at 4.94 km/s, Bottom) honeycomb core filled with 200 molecular weight polyethylene glycol only and impacted at 3.1 km/s It is seen in the highest shear rate image that the sample undergoes great changes during severe shear thickening. In a suspension, particle motion is governed by a balance between Brownian and hydrodynamic forces [1]. At the critical shear rate for an STF, the middle inset image of Figure 1, the hydrodynamic forces overtake the Brownian forces and particles begin to stay together after collisions forming hydroclusters [1]. These hydroclusters increase in number and size with increasing shear rate and lead to the increase in viscosity [2]. The rapid increase of viscosity observed in STFs has been applied to novel concepts such as improving the ballistic impact resistance of aramid fiber soft-body armor by changing the energy absorption mechanisms [3]. A recent study performed at MSU by the student’s colleagues in his research group investigated the use of STFs as a component of spacecraft shielding for mitigating highly energetic micrometeoroid/ orbital debris (MMOD) impacts [4]. Figure 2 shows two aluminum honeycomb core sandwich composite specimens from this study. The top specimen was impacted at 4.74 km/s, and its honeycomb core was filled with a STF consisting of 0.3 MF A200 in PEG 200. The bottom specimen was impacted at 3.1 km/s, and its honeycomb core was filled with PEG 200 only. Given the significantly disparate impact velocities and kinetic energies, it is remarkable that both specimens exhibited approximately the same amount of damage. The focus of this research proposal will be to investigate how combining different dispersed phase shapes and aspect ratios will affect the shear thickening response. Of particular interest is the combination of fumed silica particles with other shapes. STFs employing fumed dispersed phases (i.e. fumed silica, carbon black, etc) can exhibit the same intensity of shear thickening as spherical particle STFs but with a much lower dispersed phase mass fraction [5]. This is due to the fractal-like shape of fumed silica particles that is developed during their flame hydrolysis manufacture process where approximately 10 nm diameter spherical SiO2 primary particles collide and fuse together into linear and branched aggregates of approximately 100-200 nm in size [6]. When hydroclusters are formed from these fractal particles, larger amounts of the continuous phase are trapped within the hydrocluster than with spherical particles, which effectively increases the mass fraction of fumed particles [5]. This results in a less dense STF that would be beneficial when weight savings is a concern. This study will combine fumed silica particles with other shapes of approximately the same size to include but not limited to vapor grown carbon nanofibers and graphene nanoplatelets of varying aspect ratios. The continuous phases will be low molecular weight polymeric fluids with hydrophilic glycol chain ends. The surface chemistry of all the particles used can be altered with various functional groups to tailor the particle interaction with the hydrophilic liquid which will affect the shear thickening response. The combinations of surface chemistries might also be beneficial in preventing edimentation in the case of larger particles where gravitational forces might overcome Brownian forces. Rheological characterization of the STFs will include both steady flow and oscillatory frequency sweep experiments performed using a shear rheomoeter with parallel plate fixtures. The shear thickening responses will be compared with respect to the critical shear rate and/or shear stress marking the onset of shear thickening as well as the increase in magnitude of the apparent viscosity. During the fall of 2013 and spring of 2014 the student worked on various projects with a research group including members from the Chemistry Department, the Chemical Engineering Department, and the Aerospace Engineering Department that is headed by Dr. Thomas E Lacy, interim department head of the Aerospace Engineering Department. The student developed the requisite skills and necessary safety knowledge essential for producing quality work in a laboratory setting. These he used to complete a research project using STFs with fumed silica dispersed phases where the effect of varying the disperse phase mass fraction and disperse phase surface chemistry was investigated [7]. This work was presented in early 2014 at Jackson State University. No IRB or IACUC approval is needed for this research. References [1] N. J. Wagner, J. F. Brady, “Shear thickening in colloidal dispersions,” Physics Today, 62, 10, pp. 27-32, 2009. [2] X. Cheng, J. H. McCoy, J. N. Israelachvili, I. Cohen, “Imaging the Microscopic Structure of Shear Thinning and Thickening Colloidal Suspensions,” Science, 333, pp. 1276-1279, 2011. [3] Y. S. Lee, E. D. Wetzel, N. J. Wagner, “The ballistic impact characteristics of Kevlar woven fabrics impregnated with a colloidal shear thickening fluid,” J. Mater, Sci., 38, pp. 2825-2833, 2003. [4]J. Warren, M. Cole, S. Offenberger, T.E. Lacy, H. Toghiani, M. Burchell, S. Kundu, and C.U. Pittman, Jr. “Hypervelocity Impact of Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panels Filled with Shear Thickening Fluid,” in Proc. 28th Technical Conference of the American Society for Composites, pp. 124-135, 2013. [5] S. R. Raghavan, S. A. Khan, “Shear-thickening of fumed silica suspensions under steady and oscillatory shear,” J. of Colloid and Interface Science, 185, pp. 57-67, 1997. [6] H. Barthel, L. Rosch, J. Weis, “Fumed silica-production, properties, and applications,” Organosilicon Chemistry II: From Molecules to Materials (eds N. Auner and J. Weis), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Germany, ch. 91, pp. 761-778, 1996. [7] C. K. Mihigo, “The characterization of shear thickening fluids using four fumed silica disperse phases,” poster presentation at Jackson State University/Louis Stokes Mississippi Alliance for Minority Participation Research Symposium, Jackson State University, 2014.

Subject:
Poster, Physical Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Engineering...060100 - Aerospace Engineering
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Dr. Thomas Lacy
316 Walker Engineering
5-3623
lacy@ae.msstate.edu
Identification of Indels in 300 Lines of Zea Mays Using Bowtie2
Abstract:

Aflatoxin is produced by the fungus Aspergillus flavus, which is often found in many oil seed crops including maize (corn, Zea mays). These toxins have a minimal effect on the corn, but pose deleterious effects to human beings, acting as a lethal carcinogen and cause complications during pregnancy. Aflatoxin is also responsible for stunting human growth and compromising the immune system. Approximately 300 inbred corn lines that together contain a very diverse genetic profile and a range of diversity in regards to how they respond to aflatoxin levels was used to identify genes associated with aflatoxin accumulation resistance. Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have been conducted to identify polymorphisms, namely SNPs and indels that may account for differential levels of resistance or susceptibility in these inbred corn lines. However, although current bioinfomatics tools are able to identify SNPs, they are unable to identify Indel polymorphsims due to low coverage in the GBS data. Therefore, high profile bioinformatics tools, such as Bowtie2, will be used to index and identify these insertions and deletions. To be certain that Bowtie is capable of detecting these structural variants, 64bp reads were extracted from a gene sequence from 300 inbred lines artificially modified with an increasing insertion or deletion for each subsequent line. Bowtie2 was run several times and was confirmed to have detected up to 8 insertions and 2 deletions while maintaining decent mapping quality. Mapping quality was shown to have decreased slightly (i.e. 42, 40, 40, 24,…) in strains with insertions and substantially (i.e. 24, 23, 0, 0,…) in strains with deletions. Quality scores were noted and cutoffs were assigned for mapping probability of the reads. Moreover, this method will then be used to pinpoint actual insertions and deletions using real datasets for verification, rather than using artificial variants.

Subject:
Poster Competition - Shackouls Honors College
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011900 - Biochem,MolBio,Entmology&Plant Path
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Closed

Responsibilities:

Closed

Position Details:

Closed

Faculty Contact:
Andy Perkins
302 Butler Hall
(662) 325-0004
ap335@msstate.edu
Identifying active deubiquitinases and kinases in chicken
Abstract:

Our long-term goal is to provide tools and resources for the identification of regulatory networks in chicken relevant to growth or disease. The specific objective of this proposal is to annotate chicken deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) and kinases at a genome-scale by using chemical proteomics. Our overall hypothesis is that chicken genome encodes for multiple DUBs and kinases, which have unique distribution in tissues. The rationale for our study is that the chemical probes that react with catalytically active enzymes can be utilized to determine tissue-specific expression and activity of DUBs and kinases, improving the existing annotation of chicken genome for future research. Experimental annotation of DUBs and kinases, based on their activity will be complementary to the existing computational predictions, which are likely to be incomplete or incorrect.

Subject:
Proteomics of chicken enzymes
College & Department:
College of Veterinary Medicine...464600 - Biomedical Research Center
College of Veterinary Medicine...182000 - CVM Basic Science Department
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Send an email to: mje100@mafes.msstate.edu

Responsibilities:

Depending on interest, a student can do literature search, bioinformatics analysis or lab work (protein methods, proteomics). A person who can design a website would also be beneficial.

Position Details:

Salary is possible, depending on type of work being done and schedule.

Faculty Contact:
Mariola Edelman
Wise Center
(662) 325-4217
mje100@mafes.msstate.edu
Impact of sequence conservation on RNA-Seq alignment in co-infection studies
Abstract:

RNA-Seq is increasingly being used for gene expression profiling. When applied to studying co-infections, RNA-Seq reads could map to more than one genome due to the shared sequences between the genomes. This cross-mapping likely depends upon sequence read length. However, to date, there are no studies that evaluate the extent of this cross-mapping and the impact of the read length or the sequence conservation on read mapping. We sought to determine the relationship between the length of the reads and cross-mapping between genomes across the phylogenetic tree for bacteria. We generated artificial reads of varying lengths ranging from 35 to 200 bases using Artificial Fastq Generator. We chose two bacterial pathogens belonging to Pasteurellaceae, Histophilus somnus 2336 and Pasteurella multocida 3480 and generated a graphical representation of read length against the overall alignment rate obtained from cross-mapping. Using this analysis workflow, cross-mapping between experimental RNA-Seq data from Streptococcus pneumoniae BR1064 and Streptococcus pneumoniae ND6012 was also compared. Our results indicate that cross-mapping between H. somnus and P. multocida was negligible at 0.33%. In contrast, reads from two different strains of S. pneumoniae had cross-mapping as high as 97%. Our results suggest that the read length may not have a significant effect on the extent of cross-mapping between genomes whereas sequence conservation does impact cross mapping and needs to be taken into consideration when using RNA-Seq in co-infecton or meta-transcriptomic studies.

Subject:
Poster Competition - Shackouls Honors College
College & Department:
College of Engineering...032900 - Computer Science
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Closed

Responsibilities:

Closed

Position Details:

Closed

Faculty Contact:
Andy Perkins
302 Butler Hall
(662) 325-0004
ap335@msstate.edu
Improved gas chromatographic method optimization for the analysis of four estrog
Abstract:

An improved gas chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of four estrogenic hormones including estrone, 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol and estriol in chicken litter were developed. Estrogens were derivatized with N,O-Bis (trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA). Gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric (GC/MS) parameters including temperature program, selected ion monitoring and scan mode mass spectrometric parameters were optimized. Two GC/MS systems, a Shimadzu QP 2010S GC/MS System with a 30 m x 0.25 mm x 0.25 μm SHRXI-5MS column and an Agilent 7890A GC coupled to 5975C MS System with a 60 m x 0.32 mm x 1 μm 1DB column were used for the analyses. Scan mode mass spectrometric analyses were carried out for the initial method optimization. The 60 m column gave a baseline separation, however the signal to noise ratios (SNR) were lower and the retention times were longer. The 30 m column did not give baseline separations for all analytes, but improved SNR and shorter retention times were observed. Further method development was carried out using the 30 m column using the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mass spectrometry. Retention times of the four hormones ranged from 12.082 to 17.737 minutes. The method has an instrumental detection limits for the five target compounds ranged from 7.11 to 34.41 μg L-1. Isotopically substituted 17β- estradiol (βE2-d5) was used as the internal standard. The developed method will be employed to analyze estrogens in chicken litter. Sample preparation steps including accelerated solvent extraction and the QuEChERS method are planned to be performed prior to the derivatization and detection.

Subject:
Poster, Biological Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...031900 - Chemistry
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Dr. Todd Mlsn
Chemistry Department
5-6744
tmlsna@chemistry.msstate.edu
Integrative Modeling of Multiple Structural Conformations and its Application to
Abstract:

Segmented single-stranded RNA viruses, influenza A, have been known to cause severe infectious diseases in multiple hosts, e.g. birds, mammals, and even humans. Annual epidemics and irregular pandemics of influenza A infections continue to threaten world public health. Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes of influenza A play an essential role during viral replication and transcription and have been shown to be critical in viral host tropisms and pathogenesis. However, very little is known on how RNP complexes are conformed structurally and how genetic variations affect RNP proteins’ binding modes and thus functions. This study aims to develop and apply integrative modeling pipelines in identifying possible conformations of the PA subunit in the RNP complex. Our pipelines are composed of three major steps: first, structures for PA represented in atomic coordinate files were collected and combined using Electron Microscopy (EM) images as a restraint on conformation generation in the Integrative Modeling Platform; second, protein-protein docking was then performed in PatchDock using the same coordinate files, and solutions unable to fit into reconstructed volumes of influenza A polymerase were discarded; finally, an analysis of the binding sites in both sets of solutions was performed and the results were compared for consensus. The application of this pipeline to PA has revealed multiple, distinct binding modes of the C-terminal and N-terminal domains of PA. These conformations were generated with distinct sets of EM images, which have suggested various polymerase interaction modes. Further progress could eventually lead to the production of data that is usable in drug development of antiviral inhibitors capable of targeting these proteins.

Subject:
Poster, Biological Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Engineering...032900 - Computer Science
College of Veterinary Medicine...182010 - CVM Basic Science Dept Admin
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Dr. Xiufeng W
240 Wise Center Dr
5-3559
wan@cvm.msstate.edu
Investigating the link between stress, temperature, and metabolic inertia in lar
Abstract:

Temperature is an important factor in fish survival. Temperature can affect where a fish lives, how quickly it responds to physiological factors, and the rate of metabolic processes. Stress is a common physiological response when fish are exposed to handling practices in hatcheries and angling by the public and by professionals in tournaments. Temperature and stress response research is vital in order to support fish survival, especially in hatcheries and tournaments where fish survival is of the utmost importance. This study looks at the relationship between handling stress typical of hatcheries or anglers and a temperature drop similar to what could occur in livewells or acclimation tanks on the metabolic inertia of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides. Largemouth bass are often raised in hatcheries or caught by anglers and so were ideal for this study. We will look at the effect of handling stress and a 4°C drop in temperature on largemouth bass metabolic rate in order to determine how long it takes the fish to recover. Metabolic rate will be measured using respirometry and stress will be measured using plasma osmolality and plasma cortisol levels.

Subject:
Poster, Biological Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Forest Resources...080300 - FWRC-Wildlife,Fisheries&Aquaculture
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Peter Allen
Thompson Hall, Rm 261
(662) 325-4768
pja33@msstate.edu
IOS/Android Platform Development for Cloud Computing
Abstract:

In this project, undergraduate students will work with the Ph.D. students in my lab on mobile platform development for cloud computing applications. In particular, our lab is developing mobile applications that involve mobile cloud computing. Undergraduate students will work on mobile platform development, e.g., android, IOS, and work with our Ph.D. students who will provide our mobile cloud computing algorithms and offer help with the platform development.

Subject:
IOS/Android Platform Development
College & Department:
College of Engineering...060700 - Electrical and Computer Engineering
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Please contact me at li@ece.msstate.edu if you are interested.

Responsibilities:

Undergraduate students are expected to work on Android/IOS development.

Position Details:

Students who are familiar with Java programming or IOS programming are encouraged to apply.

Faculty Contact:
Pan Li
216 Simrall
(662) 325-3912
pl242@msstate.edu
Is Metamemory An Individual Difference?
Abstract:

Metamemory, the assessment of one’s own memory, has been shown to impact scholastic outcomes. Students use metamemory processes to predict whether they have studied enough, to select appropriate learning strategies, and to assess their confidence in recalled information. Because of the link between metamemory and learning, metamemory ability has been suggested to be a component in academic success. Metamemory has been shown to be developmental in nature, improving with experience. However, little is known about whether metamemory ability develops universally it is an individual differences trait such that metamemory ability varies across individual regardless of their environmental experiences. Although an individual differences measure of metamemory has not been developed, we have explored the relationship between metamemory accuracy and an individual differences measure of working memory. There is considerable overlap in the brain regions that have been implicated in processes of working memory and metamemory, suggesting that individual differences in working memory could be correlated with differences in metamemory accuracy. Participants in the experiment completed an Operation Span (OSPAN) task (Unsworth, Heitz, Shrock, & Engle, 2005) to establish a working memory ability score. They also participated in a typical metamemory task during which they studied cue-target word pairs, and gave a prediction about future recognition of the target word, given the cue word. Predicted recognition performance was correlated with actual recognition, creating a metamemory accuracy score for each participant. Pearson correlations showed that working memory and metamemory were not significantly correlated. However, further examination of the OSPAN scores suggested a restricted range of scores. The upper and lower quartiles were determined and an independent samples t-test was conducted on metamemory accuracy between participants with low and high working memory. A significant difference was found; participants with high working memory scores were more accurate than those with low working memory scores.

Subject:
Poster, Social Sciences
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...038600 - Psychology
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Deborah Eakin
Magruder Hall, Room 214
(662) 325-7949
de115@msstate.edu
Laser-Based Additive Manufacturing
Abstract:

Laser-based additive manufacturing (LBAM) processes can be utilized to generate functional parts (or prototypes) from the ground-up via layer-wise cladding – providing an opportunity to generate complex-shaped, functionally-graded or custom-tailored parts that can be utilized for a variety of engineering applications, including: bio-medical, aerospace, military, automotive and more. Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS), a form of LBAM, has been investigated heavily in the last several years for its use and potential related to (i) rapid prototyping of metallic parts, (ii) low-volume additive manufacture of complex and customized parts, (iii) cladding/repairing existing metallic parts and (iv) manufacture/repair in remote or logistically-weak locations. Research is being conducted on the LENS process and its relation to final part mechanical integrity. This is being accomplished by thermally-monitoring the LENS process and performing fatigue, tensile, hardness and microstructural characterization on LENS-produced parts.

Subject:
Additive Manufacturing
College & Department:
College of Engineering...192600 - Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems
College of Engineering...061700 - Mechanical Engineering
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Please email a Statement of Interest, along with a resume (if available), to both: Scott Thompson thompson@me.msstate.edu Nima Shamsaei, shamsaei@me.msstate.edu

Responsibilities:

- Specimen preparation - Assist with Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS) operation - Assist with thermal monitoring of LENS operations - Mechanical property testing - Use of SEM, X-Ray CT equipment - Data collection/reduction - Attend/participate in weekly research meetings

Position Details:

Student will primarily work with a Graduate Student involved on the project. Based on performance, the Student may become actively engaged in research meetings to discuss progress. Exceptional students will be considered for a funded research position (undergraduate or graduate).

Faculty Contact:
Scott M. Thomps
219 Carpenter Hall
(662) 325-1535
thompson@me.msstate.edu
Magnetic Nano-composites for Life Sciences Applications
Abstract:

Magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles are being used in a wide variety of applications, such as, drug delivery, materials separations, energy harvesting, and electronic displays. The surface of the nanoparticles can be functionalized in order to create a superparamagnetic core-functionalized shell structure. Many different inorganic and organic compounds can be used to functionalize the surface of the particles including silica, polymers, oleic acid, and others. The surface functionalization can be performed to maintain the magnetic response of the core particle while decreasing the aggregation of the nanoparticles in solution increasing their dispersion in various media, and altering the polarity, hydrophobicity, and charge distribution on the surface. Despite the potential of iron oxide nanoparticles in drug delivery and sensor applications, very few studies have focused on the binding properties between these magnetic nanoparticles and proteins and/or fluorescent dyes. This study will focus on the characterization and synthesis of functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and their binding properties with a bioluminescent protein and a fluorescent dye, FITC (fluorescein isothiocyanate). Several characterization methods were used including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), phase analysis light scattering (PALS), IVIS bioluminescence imaging, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Citric acid coated Fe¬3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized in the native state. Binding studies were then performed between these functionalized nanoparticles and a bioluminescent protein, firefly luciferase. It was found that luciferase could be adsorbed to the surface of the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as exhibited by a change in zeta potential from negative to positive. The potential for light emission allows these nanocomposites to play an integral role in the future of bio-imaging. This system could be an alternative to quantum dots (CdSe/ZnS) that are the currently used but which can cause in vivo cytotoxicity.

Subject:
Poster, Physical Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...031900 - Chemistry
College of Engineering...060300 - Chemical Engineering
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Dr. Keisha Wa
330 Swalm
5-2480
kwalters@che.msstate.edu
Mechanistic study of Protein Interaction with Silver Nanoparticles using Chemica
Abstract:

Protein interaction with Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is implicated in AgNP nanotoxicity and antibacterial activity. Fundamental mechanisms governing the protein interaction with AgNP remain elusive. Presented in this study is a systematic investigation of the effects of cysteine residues on the protein interaction with AgNPs. Native and chemically-modified bovine serum albumin (BSA), and wide-type and mutated protein, GB3, with 0, 1 and 2 cysteines (GB31, GB32) were used as the model proteins. AgNP dissolution was observed when AgNPs were mixed with the native and biologically modified proteins, regardless of the cysteine contents, and the dissolution rate increased with increasing protein concentration. However, the amount of AgNP dissolved depends critically on number of the protein cysteine residues that are in the reduced form. Pretreatment of protein with high concentration of silver ion drastically slows down the protein binding to AgNPs and almost entirely eliminated protein-induced AgNP dissolution. This work strongly suggests that there are multiple pathways involved in the protein- induced AgNP dissolution, and the effect of cysteine residues on the AgNP dissolution depends critically on its oxidation state.

Subject:
Talk, Biological Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...031900 - Chemistry
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Dongmao Zhang
1115 Hand Laboratory
(662) 325-6752
dz33@msstate.edu
Microsatellites as Regulatory Elements Under Selection in Natural Sunflower Popu
Abstract:

Microsatellites are short repetitive DNA sequences found throughout eukaryotic genomes. They mutate by incremental increases and decreases in the number of repeats. Microsatellite mutation rates are much higher than that of substitutions, or most other forms of indels. Research has shown that changes in microsatellite allele length influence the expression of some genes and the consequential phenotypes in organisms. However, it has yet to be demonstrated that microsatellites operate to shape phenotypes in wild populations under natural selection, nor is there any understanding of the degree to which microsatellites shape wild populations. Recently RNAseq data revealed that transcribed microsatellites routinely influence gene expression levels in natural populations of sunflowers. If allele frequencies of transcribed microsatellites show different levels of variation between populations than in anonymous, or selectively neutral, microsatellites, it will provide evidence of natural selection acting on microsatellites in transcribed regions. To test this, individuals from six populations of Helianthus annuus were genotyped at multiple transcribed and anonymous microsatellite loci and FST values were calculated for the six populations. An FST value of 0 indicates populations are genetically identical and an FST value of 1 indicates populations’ share no alleles. The mean FST value at transcribed microsatellite loci was higher than the FST value observed at anonymous microsatellite loci. The variance in FST values was also found to be higher in transcribed than in anonymous microsatellites. Both of these findings are consistent with selection acting on transcribed microsatellite loci.

Subject:
Poster, Biological Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...031100 - Biological Sciences
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Mark Welch
Harned Hall, Rm. 212
(662) 325-7564
mw497@msstate.edu
MSU Extension Undergraduate Apprenticeship Program
Abstract:

Mississippi State University (MSU) is pleased to offer eight (8) unique summer (2017) apprenticeship opportunities for qualified juniors and seniors through the MSU Extension Undergraduate Apprenticeship Program. Each apprenticeship offers an integrated research and extension experience, in which the student will work directly with a faculty specialist to assist with ongoing research and help develop a related educational product or process that successfully translates that research into relevant outreach to key stakeholders. Each apprentice will receive a $500/week stipend (for 12 weeks), plus benefits and job-related travel expenses. In order to complete the requirements of the program, each student selected for an apprenticeship must: 1) Successfully meet the learning objectives identified by the faculty specialist for his/her specific apprenticeship experience; 2) Maintain and submit a reflective journal to his/her mentor at the end of the summer semester; and 3) Develop and present a poster or presentation at an industry-related conference or professional meeting (by the end of spring semester 2018) identified by the Extension faculty specialist. This project is supported by the FY16 USDA NIFA AFRI ELI Research and Extension Experiential Learning for Undergraduates (REEU) Fellowships Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA, Grant #2017-67033-26015.

Subject:
Undergraduate Apprenticeship
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...010300 - Ag & Bio Engineering
College of Ag & Life Sciences...010700 - Ag Information Science & Education
College of Ag & Life Sciences...010500 - Agricultural Economics
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011300 - Animal & Dairy Science
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011900 - Biochem,MolBio,Entmology&Plant Path
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011500 - Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
College of Ag & Life Sciences...018800 - College of Ag & Life Sciences
College of Ag & Life Sciences...012000 - Food Sci Nutrition Hlth Promo
College of Ag & Life Sciences...012500 - Horticulture
College of Ag & Life Sciences...012102 - Human Sciences-Early Years Network
College of Ag & Life Sciences...012600 - Landscape Architecture
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011100 - Plant and Soil Sciences
College of Ag & Life Sciences...012900 - Plant Pathology & Weed Science
College of Ag & Life Sciences...013100 - Poultry Science
College of Ag & Life Sciences...012100 - School of Human Sciences
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011101 - Soil Testing
College of Arch, Art & Design...028800 - Dean of Architecture,Art, & Design
College of Arts & Sciences...030300 - Anthropology
College of Arts & Sciences...038300 - Bio & Phys Sciences Rsch Inst
College of Arts & Sciences...031100 - Biological Sciences
College of Arts & Sciences...031900 - Chemistry
College of Arts & Sciences...038800 - College of Arts & Sciences
College of Arts & Sciences...032700 - Communication
College of Arts & Sciences...034900 - Geosciences
College of Arts & Sciences...035400 - Inst For The Humanities
College of Arts & Sciences...036900 - Mathematics & Statistics
College of Arts & Sciences...038500 - Political Science and Public Adm
College of Arts & Sciences...038600 - Psychology
College of Arts & Sciences...038901 - Social Work
College of Arts & Sciences...038900 - Sociology
College of Business...048806 - Ctr for Entrepreneurship&Innovation
College of Business...048805 - Ctr of Family Enterprise Research
College of Business...041500 - Marketing/Quant Analysis/Bus Law
College of Education...054100 - Counseling, Ed Psyc, & Foundations
College of Education...051300 - Curriculum,Instruction & Special Ed
College of Education...051100 - Educational Leadership
College of Education...051500 - Educational Psychology
College of Education...053800 - Instructional Resource Center
College of Education...052300 - Instructional Syst & Workforce Devl
College of Education...053600 - Writing/Thinking Institute
College of Engineering...010300 - Agricultural and Biological Engineering
College of Forest Resources...080501 - COFR-Sustainable Bioproducts
College of Forest Resources...080301 - Colg of Forest Res-Wlf & Fisheries
College of Forest Resources...088801 - Colg of Forest Resources-Dean
College of Forest Resources...080101 - Colg of Forest Resources-Forestry
College of Forest Resources...080100 - FWRC - Forestry
College of Forest Resources...088802 - FWRC - Research Support
College of Forest Resources...080500 - FWRC-Sustainable Bioproducts
College of Forest Resources...080300 - FWRC-Wildlife,Fisheries&Aquaculture
College of Veterinary Medicine...185210 - Office of Outreach & Ext Affairs
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Visit http://extension.msstate.edu/apprentice to learn about the eight (8) available apprenticeship opportunities and apply online. The application deadline is 11:59 CST, February 28, 2017.

Responsibilities:

Each apprenticeship opportunity is unique and will have different responsibilities specific to the research and extension project(s) in which the student will participate. General responsibilities are as follows: • Work with an MSU Extension faculty specialist/mentor and other Extension personnel to coordinate research and implement related outreach program events and activities. • Maintain an ongoing, professional relationship with your assigned faculty mentor. • Participate in meetings where local issues are identified and prioritized, and program results and plans are discussed. • Assist in preparations for planned events and activities by gathering information, assembling materials, contacting participants, and soliciting support from external sources. As appropriate, conducts the teaching, training or other program presentations. • In some cases, the apprentice may identify and develop a value-added process, program, or training tool that may be implemented within the hosting unit's current operations. • Maintain a reflection journal outlining apprenticeship experiences. Complete and submit journal at the conclusion of the apprenticeship. • Will be expected to develop and present a poster or presentation at an industry-related conference or professional meeting identified by the Extension faculty specialist.

Position Details:

Duration: 12 weeks (approximately May – August, 2017) Compensation: $500/week plus benefits and travel allowance for job-related travel Minimum age: 18 Minimum requirements: • Must be currently enrolled in a four-year accredited college or university in a degree that supports the mission of Extension. • Must have completed sophomore year prior to the start of the program. • Must possess a minimum GPA of 3.0 based on a 4.0 scale at the time of application (exceptions will be considered with substantial justification). • Must be a U.S. citizen, national, or permanent resident. • Have a valid driver’s license and reliable personal vehicle. • Must be willing to travel (regionally and possibly internationally) and work flexible hours. In other words, this position requires travel connected with official duties, including attendance at night and weekend meetings, conferences, etc. (Travel reimbursement will be provided.)

Faculty Contact:
Marina Denny
267 Lloyd Ricks Watson
(662) 325-1175
mdd269@msstate.edu
National Science Foundation Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship Program
Abstract:

The National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Mathematical Sciences (DMS) aims to provide opportunities to enrich the training of graduate students in the Mathematical Sciences through the provision of an NSF Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship Program. This program will provide an opportunity for mathematical sciences doctoral students to participate in internships at national laboratories, industry and other approved facilities. Participation in an internship will provide first-hand experience of the use of mathematics in a nonacademic setting. The internships are aimed at students who are interested in understanding the application of advanced mathematical and statistical techniques to "real world" problems, regardless of whether the student plans to pursue an academic or nonacademic career.

Subject:
Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship Program
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...036900 - Mathematics & Statistics
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

How to Apply: Applications and supporting materials must be submitted at https://www.zintellect.com/Posting/Details/2806

Responsibilities:

Transportation expenses for one round trip up to $2,000 will be provided to appointed participants. 10-Week internship: The Division of Mathematical Sciences at the National Science Foundation will provide funding that will enable summer internships for graduate students in mathematics, applied mathematics and statistics. The program will support internships at domestically based facilities, including, but not exclusively, National Laboratories, private industries and nonprofit organizations. The internships are intended to introduce students to some applications of mathematics outside of academia. The internships are intended for both students that plan to pursue a career outside of academia and for students that intend to pursue a career in academia Areas of Discipline: Algebra & Number Theory, Analysis, Applied Mathematics, Combinatorics, Computational Mathematics, Foundations, Geometric Analysis, Mathematical Biology, Probability, Statistics, Topology. U.S. citizenship required Application deadline: March 1, 2017, 11:59PM EST

Position Details:

Program Information: Detailed information about the internships can be found at http://www.orise.orau.gov/nsf-msgi/default.html For questions please email us at NSF-MSGI@ORISE.ORAU.GOV.

Faculty Contact:
Scott Maynard
Montgomery Hall Room 300
(662) 325-3344
smaynard@career.msstate.edu
Need for Independence and Attitudes toward Aging
Abstract:

The two purposes of our study were to validate a scale designed to measure the need for independence in late life using factor analysis and reliability measures, and to see if the scale predicts attitudes to one’s own aging. For example fear of losing independence could lead some people to dread growing older. To do this, we placed the new Independence in Late-Life scale in a larger survey filled with scales measuring related aspects including the Personal Longevity Scale which measures attitudes toward aging. The survey was distributed to online forums specifically for or that appeal to middle age and older adults. Out of 211 who participated, 179 completed enough of the survey to be analyzed. 131 female, 46 were male, and 2 did not indicate their gender. Factor Analysis revealed two components in the independence scale: Independent Identity and Burden. When a person measures high in the Independent Identity factor, that person demonstrates a great need to do things independently. Alpha testing for this factor revealed low reliability, so we will ignore it. The factor Burden, which indicates discomfort with asking for help, did show strong reliability. We used regressions to examine the Burden factor compared to the factors Hope and Dread in the Personal Longevity Scale. High scores in the factor Burden were found to predict Dread (considering the aging process negatively) but to inversely predict viewing aging positively, Hope. Age and gender do not appear to impact this relationship. In general, the regressions revealed that people who are uncomfortable asking for help tend to consider their own aging as a negative experience, while those who are comfortable asking for help usually view aging as an honor.

Subject:
Poster Competition, Social Sciences
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...038600 - Psychology
393400 - Shackouls Honors College - nSPARC
Other - nSPARC
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Closed

Responsibilities:

Closed

Position Details:

Closed

Faculty Contact:
Carolyn Adams-P
Magruder Hall, Rm 215
(662) 325-7658
cea1@psychology.Msstate.Edu
NSF Project to Investigate using Robots to Collect Sensitive Information from Children
Abstract:

Children are often asked to provide sensitive information, whether about bullying experiences or experiences related to maltreatment. However, even well-meaning interviewers can bias children's responses, leading to false memories. We are a team of researchers in Psychology, Sociology, and Computer Science who are testing whether using robots to interview children will reduce the potential for bias and reduce the possibility of implanting false memories.

Subject:
Paid part-time position for full-time student
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...038600 - Psychology
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Send an email with your resume, class schedule, net ID, and contact information to deakin@psychology.msstate.edu. An interview will be scheduled.

Responsibilities:

Will assist the project team in all aspects of the study, including materials development, data collection, and data analysis. Will attend interdisciplinary team meetings, and will be responsible for interacting with children in a research setting. Will be required to do written reports. Pay rate = $9.00/hour

Position Details:

Qualifications: • Full-time student, anticipated graduation date no sooner than May 2017. • Available evenings • Available during summer • Dependable transportation • Some background in human-subjects research (e.g., research method class, cognitive psychology class, etc.) • Proficient in Microsoft Word and Excel • Detail-oriented • Excellent communication skills, both written and verbal Preferred Qualifications (but not required): • Experience working with children • Prior Psychology or Sociology research experience

Faculty Contact:
Deborah Eakin
Magruder Hall, Room 214
(662) 325-7949
de115@msstate.edu
Performance Comparison between BioViz Versions
Abstract:

This project is a performance comparison between two versions of the BioViz application (written using two different JavaScript libraries/APIs) that allow the visual analysis of gene expression atlases. The gene expression atlases are sampled from chickens and provide information about when and where biological processes such as transcription, translation and genetic variation occur. Due to their large size, it has been a difficult task to analyze chicken atlas data. The bovine atlas contains 7.2 million unique 20 base transcript tags profiled from 81 tissues. In addition, current tools such as GBrowse are cumbersome and do not facilitate cross-tissue or similar comparison. The application developed in order to propose a more efficient way to visualize and analyze gene expression data is called BioViz. BioViz is a web application. In its first iteration, BioViz was written using JavaScript’s d3 library which handles data visualization. In an attempt to improve performance, the BioViz application was redeveloped using JavaScript’s Three library. The goal of this project is to conduct performance comparisons of the two application versions using Developer tools. Both versions will be tested using the same set of atlas data and the better performer of the two versions will get chosen to continue in development.

Subject:
Poster, Biological Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Engineering...032900 - Computer Science
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Dr. T. Jankun
Butler 319
5-7504
tjk@cse.msstate.edu
Polymorphisn in Solid Lipid Nanoparticles
Abstract:

Major advances have been made in nanotechnology, and it is known that silver nanoparticles have many applications including cancer treatment. Nanoparticles have different properties from their bulk material, and the sizes of nanoparticles are important. Dispersions with varying sizes of silver nanoparticles exhibit different colors. The absorbance of dispersions can be measured using a spectrophotometer. The spectrophotometer shows absorption as it relates to wavelength and gives a correlation between wavelength and nanoparticle size. In these experiments silver nanoparticles of different sizes were synthesized using sodium citrate, silver nitrate, hydrogen peroxide, potassium bromide, sodium borohydride and potassium chloride. Specifically, the effects of potassium bromide (KBr) and potassium chloride (KCl) concentrations on particle size were studied by varying the concentrations of KBr and KCl, and by measuring the resulting absorption spectrum. It was shown that the increasing of KBr concentration resulted in smaller particle sizes, and increasing the KCl concentration decreased the particle size. Samples with high amounts of KCl seemed to have some agglomeration. The maximum absorbance of the particles decreased as the particle size decreased. The size of silver nanoparticles was also characterized using TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) where particles under 30 nanometers could be seen.

Subject:
Poster, Physical Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Engineering...060300 - Chemical Engineering
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Dr. Priscilla
330 Swalm
5-8249
phill@che.msstate.edu
Problem Solving and Learning Lab
Abstract:

Research in the Problem Solving and Learning Lab focuses on two main areas of cognitive psychology. The first line of research seeks to understand how people solve complex problems especially when the problem requires the generation of novel or creative solutions. The second line of research in the lab involves examining the neural correlates of employing effective learning and training strategies. For both of these lines of research, we use neuroimaging tools and eye tracking to understand how these cognitive processes work. This coming semester we have projects looking at how people solve problems, how people monitor their own comprehension, individual differences associated with multitasking performance, and how people anticipate the next action in a story.

Subject:
Cognitive Science
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...038600 - Psychology
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Contact Dr. Jarrod Moss at jarrod.moss@psllab.org and ask for an application.

Responsibilities:

Will assist with data collection and analysis.

Position Details:

Student will primarily work with Graduate Students involved on the project. Based on performance, the Student may become actively engaged in research meetings to discuss progress. Exceptional students will be considered for a funded research position (undergraduate or graduate).

Faculty Contact:
Robert Moss
Magruder Hall, Rm 305
(662) 325-8250
jarrod.moss@msstate.edu
Quantitative PCR Confirms That Transcribed Microsatellites Play Role in Generati
Abstract:

Microsatellites are tandem repeats of short DNA sequences that are ubiquitous in eukaryotic genomes. These repeats are highly polymorphic due to a high indel mutation rate. It has been proposed that some microsatellites may act as “tuning knobs”where incremental increases and decreases are associated with correlated effects on phenotypes under selection. There is now evidence that microsatellites can influence gene expression levels. If true, the tuning knob model would suggest mutation generates heritable variation at rates greatly exceeding what theorists typically predict. RNA-Seq data for 95 sunflowers was recently used to demonstrate a strong correlation between microsatellite allele lengths and gene expression levels. RNA-Seq is a next-gen sequencing technique that provides gene expression estimates in addition to mRNA sequence data. Very little is currently known about potential biases in RNA-Seq data. To verify the RNA-Seq results, seven loci in the same 95 sunflower samples with transcribed microsatellites were assayed for relative gene expression levels using Taqman Gene Expression Assays. These seven loci containing microsatellites revealed significant correlations between microsatellites allele length and gene expression levels. The relative gene expression levels estimated using RNA-Seq and Taqman Gene Expression Assays were compared. Results indicate that estimates of gene expression at these loci based on RNA-Seq and QPCR are tightly correlated. This finding validates the relative gene expression estimates based on RNA-Seq data. These results verify that gene expression variation in the RNA-Seq data does not reflect sequencing biases. Hence, the role of transcribed microsatellites in rapidly generating adaptive genetic variation is supported.

Subject:
Poster Competition - Shackouls Honors College
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...031100 - Biological Sciences
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Closed

Responsibilities:

Closed

Position Details:

Closed

Faculty Contact:
Mark Welch
Harned Hall, Rm. 212
(662) 325-7564
mw497@msstate.edu
Recent Changes in Anhedonia are Associated with Depression Over and Above Trait
Abstract:

Depression is often characterized by the presence of anhedonia, which is the loss of interest and/or pleasure in people and/or things (Treadway & Zald, 2011). There are many ways that anhedonia has been operationalized in psychology. For example, anhedonia can be measured via trait-‐level anticipatory (i.e., wanting) and consummatory (i.e., liking) aspects of pleasure (Gard et al., 2006). This, however, risks discounting recent changes in anhedonia (Winer et al., 2014), which could prove a major factor in predicting depression. To examine whether recent changes in anhedonia were differentially predictive of depressive symptoms than were trait anticipatory and consummatory anhedonia, we analyzed the relationship between the TEPS anticipatory and consummatory anhedonia subscales and the SLIPS recent changes in anhedonia scale, using the QIDS-‐SR as the measure of depression (Rush et al., 2003). A total of 751 valid-‐responding individuals recruited from MTurk completed these measures and a validity check. We investigated whether anticipatory and consummatory pleasure, or recent changes in anhedonia, were more closely associated with current symptoms of depression. We hypothesized that recent changes in anhedonia would significantly predict symptoms of depression even when accounting for consummatory and anticipatory pleasure. We utilized 2-‐step hierarchal regression. In step one, we predicted that anticipatory anhedonia would be significantly related to depressive symptoms but that in step two recent changes in anhedonia would be independently related to depression, and anticipatory anhedonia will no longer be significant. Initially, anticipatory pleasure was associated with depressive symptoms (β = -‐.396, t = -‐9.26, p < .001). When recent changes in anhedonia were added, (β = .671, t = 22.649, p < .001), however, trait anticipatory pleasure was no longer significant (β = -‐.034, t = -‐1.446, p = .149). These findings suggest that recent changes in anhedonia may yield unique incremental validity in predicting depression.

Subject:
Poster, Social Sciences
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...038600 - Psychology
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Eric Winer
110 Magruder Hall
(662) 325-1249
sw1388@msstate.edu
Regulation and Resilience Program
Abstract:

Studies in the Regulation and Resilience Research Lab will seek to understand more about the following topics: · Child welfare and prevention of maltreatment · Parental mental health and influence on parent-child relationship · Parenting influences on emotion regulation · Influence of attachment on conflict and resilience · Etiology and assessment of emotion regulation

Subject:
Emotion Regulation and Resilience
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...038600 - Psychology
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Students who are interested in this work are encouraged to email Dr. Oliveros.

Responsibilities:

Students working in this lab have the opportunity to be involved in setting up studies, data-collection, literature reviews, and conference presentations. Qualified students may conduct independent or collaborative research projects where they begin with a research idea and finish by presenting their findings via conferences and journals.

Position Details:

Voluntary research assistant for the first semester. Subsequent semesters in the lab include the option of registering in Directed Individual Study for credit.

Faculty Contact:
Arazais Olivero
202 Magruder Hall
(662) 325-1146
ado56@msstate.edu
Rendon Foundation Art Competition - Creative Discovery
Abstract:

STARKVILLE, Miss.--Starkville's Del Rendon Foundation is inviting submissions to a 2015 art competition designed to continue "The Dead Entertainers" series the late artist created. Mississippi State's Center for Student Activities is accepting the submissions through Feb 13. Applications may be downloaded at www.union.msstate.edu/centerforstudentactivities/ or picked up at the university in Colvard Student Union, Suite 314. The first-place prize is $1,000 and the winner will be announced March 5 during a 5-7 p.m. reception at the union's second-floor art gallery. Entrants must agree to have their works displayed Feb. 17��"March 19 in the "Before their Time: A Del Rendon Foundation Art Series" exhibition. The foundation, whose website is www.delrendon.org, reserves the right to copy all entered original art and sell reproduced prints, posters and other items to support the MSU Endowed Del Rendon Art Scholarship, regardless of final sale or ownership of the paintings. Participants also will have the option to include their work in a silent auction taking place during Del Fest, an annual performance of local musicians at Dave's Dark Horse Tavern on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. As with other funds raised, auction proceeds will go to support the foundation. Artists not wishing to participate in the silent auction may pick up their artwork March 21. Completed by Rendon in the late 1990s, the four original "Dead Entertainers" pieces were commissioned to hang in downtown Starkville's State Theater. Eventually, they were relocated to the Dark Horse Tavern and, after Rendon's death, to a private residence. The original 40-by-60-inch acrylic-on-cardboard paintings include figurative interpretations of entertainment icons Jimi Hendrix, John Lennon, Marilyn Monroe and Elvis Presley. Prints of those originals have been reproduced extensively and sold to support the scholarship fund. Through the annual competition, the foundation seeks to continue the series with additional interpretations of other late entertainers of note. While scholarship fund-raising is essential, organization officials say the competition's ultimate goal is to inspire the creation of art. Though not wishing to limit or constrain artistic styles, the competition does require entrants to mirror the Rendon originals--that is, painted with acrylics or oils on 40-by-60-inch cardboard, wood or canvas. Entries must be accompanied by a brief narrative describing the design, creation and style of painting. Submitted pieces also should be ready for display with hanging mechanisms. The Colvard Union Gallery regularly features student and museum shows, traveling exhibits, solo and group exhibitions by professional artists, and special events. For more information on the Rendon or other 2015 activities, visit www.union.msstate.edu or telephone 662-325-2930.

Subject:
The Dead Entertainers Series
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...030500 - Art Department
Other - Del Rendon Foundation
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Applications may be downloaded at www.union.msstate.edu/centerforstudentactivities/ or picked up at the university in Colvard Student Union, Suite 314.

Responsibilities:

Entrants must agree to have their works displayed Feb. 17��"March 19 in the "Before their Time: A Del Rendon Foundation Art Series" exhibition.

Position Details:

The first-place prize is $1,000 and the winner will be announced March 5 during a 5-7 p.m. reception at the union's second-floor art gallery.

Faculty Contact:
Scott Maynard
Montgomery Hall Room 300
(662) 325-3344
smaynard@career.msstate.edu
Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) – Nanotechnology for Biology and Engineering
Abstract:

The Institute for NanoBioTechnology at Johns Hopkins University offers undergraduate students from colleges and universities around the country a chance to participate in research projects in the exciting and rapidly growing area of nanobiotechnology, a place where biology, medicine, and nanotech meet. Enjoy 10 weeks of research in the fields of nanotechnology for biology and bioengineering in a hands-on, graduate level laboratory. The Institute for NanoBioTechnology at Johns Hopkins University offers undergraduate students from colleges and universities around the country a chance to participate in research projects in the exciting and rapidly growing area of nanobiotechnology, a place where biology, medicine, and nanotech meet. Enjoy 10 weeks of research in the fields of nanotechnology for biology and bioengineering in a hands-on, graduate level laboratory. Desired Skills & Experience -Undergraduate students from all institutions who have at least completed their freshman year and will not be graduating before the start of the program. -Under-represented students in science and engineering are encouraged to apply. -Per NSF guidelines, only U.S. citizens and permanent residents are eligible to apply, Johns Hopkins University students are not eligible. -GPA of 3.5 or better .

Subject:
Nanotechnology
College & Department:
Other - John Hopkins University Institute for NanoBio Technology
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

http://inbt.jhu.edu/education/undergraduate/reu/ The application opens November 1, 2016. . All Engineering Chemistry Biological Sciences Microbiology

Responsibilities:

See Above

Position Details:

Camille Mathis Academic Program Administrator 3400 North Charles Street Baltimore, Maryland 21218 United States

Faculty Contact:
Scott Maynard
Montgomery Hall Room 300
(662) 325-3344
smaynard@career.msstate.edu
Rosetta Commons Research Experience for Undergraduates
Abstract:

Interns in this geographically-distributed REU program have the opportunity to participate in research using the Rosetta Commons software. The Rosetta Commons software suite includes algorithms for computational modeling and analysis of protein structures. It has enabled notable scientific advances in computational biology, including de novo protein design, enzyme design, ligand docking, and structure prediction of biological macromolecules and macromolecular complexes. The Program: -One week of Rosetta Code School, where you will learn the inner details of the Rosetta C++ code and community coding environment, so you are fully prepared for the summer! -8 weeks of hands-on research in a molecular modeling and design laboratory, developing new algorithms and discovering new science. -The summer will finish with a trip to the Rosetta Conference, where you will present your research in a poster and connect with Rosetta developers from around the world. The sponsor, NSF, will provide housing, travel expenses, and a stipend. Desired Skills & Experience: -College Sophomores or Juniors Major in computer science, engineering, mathematics, chemistry, biology, and/or biophysics. -Available for at least 10 weeks during the summer of 2017 -Interest in graduate school -While not required, we seek candidates with some combination of experiences in scientific or academic research, C++/Python/*nix/databases, software engineering, object-oriented programming, and/or collaborative development. -Only U.S. citizens and permanent residents are eligible to apply per NSF guidelines. **Pending 2016 approval

Subject:
Computational Modeling
College & Department:
Outside Agency - FXI
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Apply at: https://www.rosettacommons.org/about/intern The application opens November 1, 2016.

Responsibilities:

Majors Needed: Chemistry Math Microbiology Biological Sciences Engineering

Position Details:

See Above

Faculty Contact:
Scott Maynard
Montgomery Hall Room 300
(662) 325-3344
smaynard@career.msstate.edu
Screening Elite Cotton Genotype from Different Breeding Programs for Low Tempera
Abstract:

Since temperature and drought stresses are the two major factors limiting crop performance across the world, cotton breeders strive to develop region- and stress- specific genotypes for a niche environment. We hypothesize that there exists genetic variability among the genotypes developed at different U.S. cotton breeding programs. Nine elite Upland germplasm (Gossypium hirsutum) lines from the Regional Breeders Testing Network (RBTN) supported by Cotton Incorporated (www.cottonrbtn.com) from nine US states were evaluated for cold and drought stresses during seed germination and seedling growth stages. An experiment was conducted in sunlit plant growth chambers known as soil-plant-atmosphere-research (SPAR) units. The treatments include control (optimum temperature, 30/22°C), low temperature (22/13°C) and drought stress at optimum temperature. There were three replications arranged randomly in each treatment in nine SPAR units. The control and low temperature-grown plants were well-watered while the drought stress treatments were irrigated at 50% of the control. After 25 days after seeding, morpho-physiological parameters including root traits using winRHIZO root image analysis system were measured. Genotypes differed for leaf area and root diameter, length and root surface area per unit weight, and time to 50% seed emergence. All measured parameters differed significantly at low temperature, and drought conditions differed except in root average diameter, root tips, total pigments, and time to 50% emergence. Low temperature sensitivity response index (LTSRI) and drought sensitivity response index (DSRI) were estimated by summing individual response indices calculated as the value of a parameter at stress condition divided by the value for same parameter at optimum condition. Accordingly, cotton genotypes were classified as cold sensitive (3), moderately cold tolerant (2), and cold tolerant (4) based on combined LTSRI. Similarly, genotypes were classified as drought sensitive (2), moderately drought sensitive (2), moderately drought tolerant (1), and drought tolerant (1) based on combined DSRI. Among the nine genotypes tested, OA-33 was the most low-temperature tolerant and Acala 1517-99 was the most drought tolerant. The identified cold and drought tolerant genotypes could be used in cotton breeding programs to develop new genotypes for low temperature and drought tolerance.

Subject:
Poster, Biological Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011100 - Plant and Soil Sciences
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Dr. Kambham R
Northfarm Bldg 32, Rm 100
5-9463
krreddy@pss.msstate.edu
Silica supported gold nanoparticle catalyst for oxidation of carbon monoxide and
Abstract:

Automobiles greatly impact the quality of air by releasing pollutants in their exhaust. Pollutants emitted by automobiles, such as nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM), carbon monoxide (CO), and unburned hydrocarbons (UHC), negatively affect humans’ health and the environment. Currently, exhaust emissions can be well-controlled by using alternative fuels (e.g. natural gas), alternative engines (e.g. low temperature combustion engines) and after treatment devices (e.g. diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC)); however, the pollution controls for heavy-duty diesel engines are complicated and expensive. Nowadays, a persistent challenge in diesel engine combustion is the simultaneous reduction of NOX and smoke emissions. Dual fuel combustion in diesel engines successfully addresses this challenge within the engine cylinders. Although this strategy can considerably reduce NOX and smoke emissions, it also results in substantially higher engine-out carbon monoxide (CO) and total UHC emissions. With a low temperature diesel-ignited dual fuel combustion in diesel engine the exhaust temperature is not high enough to activate conventional catalysts (Platinum, palladium, or iridium) to oxidize CO and UHC. Our research team is investigating the catalytic activity of various gold-based catalysts in the oxidation of CO and UHC produced by diesel-ignited dual fuel low temperature combustion engine. With the knowledge that gold nanoparticles with diameters of less than 5nm are very active for the oxidation of CO, a gold catalyst supported on silica was produced. Au(en2)Cl31 was synthesized and used as the gold precursor. Using Au(en2)Cl3 lead to the formation of [Au(en2)]+3 positive complex in the solution. Also, it is well- known that silica’s surface charge is negative due to its very low isoelectric point2. As a result; we expected gold nanoparticles and silica to form a very stable catalyst which is suitable for the catalytic oxidation of CO. Au/SiO2 catalyst was characterized using X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

Subject:
Poster, Physical Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Engineering...060300 - Chemical Engineering
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Dr. Hossein T
330 Swalm
5-8607
hossein@che.msstate.edu
Simulated Frost Injury Effects on Early Planted Corn (Zea mays L.)
Abstract:

Ongoing research at Mississippi State University suggests that early planted hybrid corn (Zea mays L.) will increase productivity by avoiding the heat and drought present during June and July within this region. A potential downfall of planting early corn is the late frosts that may occur between the months of March and April. This is a risk to the producer because under these circumstances, a young corn crop may be injured or lost as a result of frost damage. We simulated frost damage to determine which growth stages are most susceptible to frost injury. We evaluated variation in response to frost among three commercial hybrids to discover which ones are most resistant to cold temperatures and likely to withstand frost. Two biomass removal techniques were selected to simulate damage caused by frost. By applying either a burn or chop treatment, hybrids at various early growth stages were forced to regenerate after suffering either cellular damage or defoliation. Data collected includes plant height, leaf area, chlorophyll content and delay to reaching reproductive maturity. Hybrids selected for this trial include Dekalb DKC 62-08, DKC 66-97 and Pioneer P 2088 due to yield performance and a varying range of 112, 116, and 120, days to maturity. Overall, our results agree with previous studies in which the earlier growth stages (V1-V3) experienced the least susceptibility, while the later growth stages (V4-V6) experienced the greatest. Variation was identified among the three hybrids; however, additional data yet to be collected including biomass (1m/row) and yield (bu/A) will determine which hybrid is most likely to withstand actual frost injury. The information generated by this study can be useful in helping a producer determine which hybrid to plant in an early-planting scenario and if a late frost occurs, whether or not a replanting decision should be made.

Subject:
Poster, Biological Sciences and Engineering
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011100 - Plant and Soil Sciences
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
William Henry
117 Dorman Hall
(662) 325-2311
wbh3@msstate.edu
Student Intern - Enterprise Information Systems Support Technical Undergrad Summer
Abstract:

About Sandia Sandia National Laboratories is the nation's premier science and engineering lab for national security and technology innovation. We are a world-class team of scientists, engineers, technologists, post docs, and visiting researchers all focused on cutting-edge technology, ranging from homeland defense, global security, biotechnology, and environmental preservation to energy and combustion research, computer security, and nuclear defense.

Subject:
Computer Science / Statistics
College & Department:
Other - Sandia National Laboratories
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

http://sandia.jobs/albuquerque-nm/student-intern-enterprise-information-systems-support-technical-undergrad-summer-2015/361082D1279F454C822C718AC6F063E0/job/?utm_source=nace&utm_medium=JOBS&utm_campaign=DE-Pilot/

Responsibilities:

About Sandia Sandia National Laboratories is the nation's premier science and engineering lab for national security and technology innovation. We are a world-class team of scientists, engineers, technologists, post docs, and visiting researchers all focused on cutting-edge technology, ranging from homeland defense, global security, biotechnology, and environmental preservation to energy and combustion research, computer security, and nuclear defense. To learn more, visit http://www.sandia.gov. Department Description Business Unit 9540 serves Sandia by providing agile, integrated, process-based IT solutions that enable our customers to achieve their business objectives and regulatory requirements effectively and efficiently. We optimize information systems at the enterprise level through process and technology consolidation, simplification and standardization and in doing so, help our customers satisfy their customer needs, enhance their ability to attract new business, and ultimately transform their business operations. Job Summary Performs entry-level work within a science and engineering environment involving assignments that may include assisting with research, application of project design and diagnostics, testing and documentation, development and analysis of technology options, and assembly and troubleshooting. Primary Job Duties Job assignments vary upon organization, discipline preference, and specific job requirements as defined in the job specification. Duties may include assisting technical staff with developmental research, analysis of technology and engineering options, project design, testing, formulating conclusions, data collection, and analyzing experimental data. Job Specifications: Sandia National Laboratories Enterprise Information Systems Business Unit 09540 is seeking summer student interns to work in teams to support Enterprise Resource Planning, Enterprise Architecture Strategies, Environmental Safety & Health, Human Resource Systems, Health Benefit & Employee Systems, Enterprise Software Systems, and Enterprise Business Intelligence development. The position would include a student to provide testing, programming, and project management support. The student will be given assignments and expected to complete and report back on them. Selected applicants may be interviewed with a manager-led team for placement to a specific position. Applicants must submit a current copy of their resume listing cumulative GPAs for all degrees to be considered for this position. Knowledge, Skills & Abilities General knowledge of technical principles and processes. Understanding of the use a variety of research tools. Good oral and written communication skills. Ability to contribute in a team environment. General knowledge of project management. General knowledge and good understanding of a suite of software, including Microsoft Office. Required The successful candidate must meet the following Sandia Student Intern Requirements: Official acceptance into an accredited university's undergraduate program, full-time enrollment (typically 12 credit hours), a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.2/4.0, the ability to work up to 25 hours per week during the academic year, and up to 40 hours per week during the summer. U.S. citizenship. 1) Familiarity with program testing, SQL, basic programming concepts, and object oriented concepts 2) Excellent interpersonal and communication skills 3) Ability to receive and complete team assignments 4) Ability to work with the Microsoft Office Suite Desired 1) Familiarity with relational databases such as Oracle or MicroSoft SqlServer 2) Familiarity with System Development Life Cycles 3) Experience in JAVA, J2EE, .Net 4) Ability to get a Security Clearance Security Clearance No clearance required. This position does not currently require a Department of Energy (DOE)-granted security clearance. Sandia will conduct a pre-employment background review that includes personal reference checks, law enforcement record checks, and employment and education verifications. Further, employees in New Mexico must pass a U.S. Air Force background screen for access to the work site. Substance abuse or illegal drug use, falsification of information, criminal activity, serious misconduct or other indicators of untrustworthiness can cause access to be denied or terminated, rendering the inability to perform the duties assigned and resulting in termination of employment. If hired without a clearance, and one subsequently becomes required or you bid on positions that require a DOE-granted security clearance, a pre-processing background review that includes personal reference checks, law enforcement record and credit checks, and employment and education verifications may be conducted prior to a required federal background investigation. Applicants for DOE-granted security clearances must be U.S. citizens and be able to obtain and maintain the appropriate DOE security clearance as required for the position. Benefits At Sandia you will receive many benefits as a valued employee of a premier national multi-program engineering and science research laboratory. In our Total Rewards package you will enjoy competitive pay, great benefits, a stimulating, positive environment and learning opportunities that will help build your career. More information may be found on our Careers website. EEO Sandia National Laboratories is an Equal Opportunity Employer of qualified women, minorities, individuals with disabilities and protected veterans.

Position Details:

See Above

Faculty Contact:
Scott Maynard
Montgomery Hall Room 300
(662) 325-3344
smaynard@career.msstate.edu
Studies to Understand Development in Organic Settings (STUDIOS)
Abstract:

Studies To Understand Development in Organic Settings (STUDIOS) The goal of Studies to Understand Development in Organic Settings- (Studios) are to describe the associations between a learners’ brain structure and activation patterns coupled with particular the elements or traits of a learning environment. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging or fMRI allows researchers to directly observe brain function by mapping the shape, structure, and blood flow that corresponds to thought processes. Ultimately, the data gathered from these studies will determine which combination of qualities—within the learners and their corresponding learning environment—lead toward or away from more rigorous academic engagement. Specific objectives of Studios-G are to gather longitudinal measures of the specific characteristics of adolescent state anxiety, trait anxiety, stress, coping strategies, body weight, body fat, waist circumference, blood pressure, height, sitting height, blood glucose, physical activity, academic performance, brain structure, brain activation, and school engagement plus longitudinal measures of each participants’ learning environment in order to determine—via multiple regression—how these factors, individually or in tandem, influence engagement in rigorous academic content across a third through twelfth grade experiment span. Following are the objectives of the project: a. To describe the relationship between brain physiology and activity and underserved learners’ social-emotional factors b. To describe the relationship between brain physiology and activity and underserved learners’ physical fitness c. To describe the relationship between brain physiology and activity and underserved learners’ academic performance d. To describe the relationship between brain physiology and activity and underserved learners’ 3rd through 12th grade STEM studio learning environment e. To compare underserved learners’ characteristics and their respective brains for significant differences in structure and activation patterns The behavioral measures for the objectives will begin in year one of the project and will continue through year five. Brain imaging data collection will begin in year three of the project and continue through year five.

Subject:
Developmental Learning Science
College & Department:
College of Education...054100 - Counseling, Ed Psyc, & Foundations
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Contact Kay Brocato by e-mail or text message to kbrocato@colled.msstate.edu or 662-312-9703

Responsibilities:

Research assistants for this project would participate in data management and analysis. Some expertise with quantitative and qualitative analysis is preferred. A team of 2-3 research assistants is also preferred.

Position Details:

If you are interested in blazing new research trails here at Mississippi State University, this is the assistantship for you and 1-2 of your closest compatible colleagues. Most of the work will take place on the University campus in professional settings wherein the research assistant will meet and interact with scholars regularly. Some of the tasks may appear to be clerical but are actually all very important administrative records tasks that become part of the research data once commenced. All of the work will be exciting and cutting edge! Text or e-mail Dr. Kay on this one!

Faculty Contact:
Donna Brocato
508B Allen Hall
(662) 325-7060
dkb3@ra.msstate.edu
Surface area and envelope volume of growing broilers from 35 d to 63 d of age
Abstract:

Mississippi’s climate is classified as humid-subtropical, having hot, humid summers. These weather conditions can precipitate thermal conditions in poultry housing which can compromise bird well-being and cause decreased production efficiency, requiring more feed and energy to reach market weight. Energy (heat) exchanged between an animal and its environment occurs via conduction, convection, and radiation, as well as through evaporation. In terms of broiler housing, increasing heat loss through convection is most easily accomplished. The ability to accurately model convective heat transfer from birds would allow for the evaluation of the effects of differing thermal conditions, evaporative cooling systems, and ventilation strategies on bird body temperature and performance. The objective of this project was to characterize surface area (SA) and envelope volume (VOL) of growing broiler birds to improve estimates of convective heat loss coefficients during tunnel ventilation (35d to 63d). A 3D scanning methodology was developed using a Creaform MegaCapturor 3D Digitizer and a commercially available software package. The non-invasive system used four cameras with a built-in phase shifted moiré projector to scan an animal over a 3-4 s period. Thirty Ross x Ross 708 broilers (15 male /15 female) were scanned at 35, 49, and 63 d of age. These images were stitched into 3D surface polygons for analysis. Mean SA for males was 3,078±176, 3,576±346, and 3,111±85 at 35, 49 and 63 d of age, respectively. Mean SA for females was 3,886±399, 3,287±391, and 2,470±98 at 35,49 and 63 d of age, respectively. Volumes followed a similar trend that was counter intuitive. We are working to improve the estimation of SA from birds at the 35 and 49 d of age as they had high variability and were larger than the larger birds at 63d.

Subject:
Poster Competition
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...010300 - Ag & Bio Engineering
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Closed

Responsibilities:

Closed

Position Details:

Closed

Faculty Contact:
Dr. Jeremiah Da
ABE Building Room 243
662-325-7347
jdavis@abe.msstate.edu
Sustainable Agriculture Research Apprenticeship
Abstract:

The Center for Environmental Farming Systems Sustainable Agriculture Research Apprenticeship Program is seeking highly-motivated individuals from a variety of different backgrounds to participate in a hands-on work and study program that trains participants in many aspects of sustainable agriculture production and research. The majority of each apprentices’ work will focus on a particular production system at CEFS, although locations will vary. A wide array of topics to study are available, including: Small Farm Production, Agroecological Production Techniques and Long-term Comparative Farming Systems. Apprenticeship appointments are for a period of time of six to eight months and are located in Greensboro, Raleigh or Goldsboro, NC. During that time, Apprentices will have the opportunity to: Immerse oneself in agricultural production and field research, spending up to forty hours a week as an integral part of a team, Work with a highly diverse team of educators from North Carolina State University, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University and the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services; Interact with other Apprentices at various research units and sites; Participate in field trips to local farms.

Subject:
Environmental Farming
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...010300 - Ag & Bio Engineering
College of Ag & Life Sciences...010700 - Ag Information Science & Education
College of Ag & Life Sciences...010500 - Agricultural Economics
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011300 - Animal & Dairy Science
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011900 - Biochem,MolBio,Entmology&Plant Path
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011500 - Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
College of Ag & Life Sciences...018800 - College of Ag & Life Sciences
College of Ag & Life Sciences...012500 - Horticulture
College of Ag & Life Sciences...012600 - Landscape Architecture
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011100 - Plant and Soil Sciences
College of Ag & Life Sciences...012900 - Plant Pathology & Weed Science
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011101 - Soil Testing
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Please submit the following with your application: Cover Letter Resume Letter of Recommendation to lisa_forehand@ncsu.edu

Responsibilities:

See Abstract

Position Details:

See Abstract

Faculty Contact:
Scott Maynard
Montgomery Hall Room 300
(662) 325-3344
smaynard@career.msstate.edu
Synthesis of Protein-Loaded Theranostic Nanoparticles Using Three Methods: Optim
Abstract:

Vascular calcification is the buildup of mineral deposits along the inner or middle layers of blood vessels in patients with chronic kidney disease, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. Research has shown that vascular calcification is associated with the degradation of elastin, a major protein within the arteries that provides resilience. In a novel attempt to treat and image the calcification, we want to synthesize theranostic elastin-targeted nanoparticles loaded with a therapeutic protein and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Nanoparticles are nanometer-sized substances that are engineered to deliver drugs in prolonged, effective doses with little to no alterations in stability. Theranostic nanoparticles allow for both diagnosis and treatment of diseases by incorporating both therapeutic and imaging agents in a single molecule. In this case, the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles aids in imaging the damaged elastin, as it is used as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Simultaneously, the therapeutic protein will be released to treat the calcification. However, difficulty remains with effectively co-encapsulating proteins and iron oxide nanoparticles in a biodegradable nanoparticle under 200 nm, the ideal size to avoid clearance in vivo. Encapsulating proteins is made especially difficult due to the possibility of becoming altered during the process and low encapsulation of hydrophilic proteins when using less harmful methods. For this project, we will be co-encapsulating iron oxide nanoparticles and a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), in PLGA nanoparticles. They will be synthesized using three methods: water-in-oil-in-water double emulsion, solid-in-oil-in-water single emulsion, and modified nanoprecipitation. Once the nanoparticles are synthesized, their static and hydrodynamic sizes will be measured, and the encapsulation efficiency of the protein and iron oxide nanoparticles will be determined. Using this data, we can evaluate which method will be ideal for creating small nanoparticles (

Subject:
Poster, Biological Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...010300 - Ag & Bio Engineering
College of Engineering...060300 - Chemical Engineering
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Chartrisa Simps
123 Agricultural Engineering Bldg.
(662) 325-8279
cls893@msstate.edu
Synthesis, Characterization, and X-ray Molecular Structure of an Unsymmetrical T
Abstract:

Tridentate meridional “pincer” ligands, which were first reported by Shaw in 1976, have become recognized as an important class of ligands for transition metal complexes. The unique steric and electronic tunability of pincer ligands has resulted in pincer- transition metal complexes being exploited as catalysts for a multitude transformations, including alkane dehydrogenation, C–C, and C–N bond formation. The catalytic impact of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) moieties as late-transition metal ligands has been rigorously investigated since their isolation by Arduengo et. al. in 1991. NHCs have become ubiquitous in late-transition metal chemistry with applications in photoluminescence, hydrosilylation, C−C coupling, and olefin metathesis. This is attributed to NHCs being stronger σ-donors than even the strongest phosphine analogues, thus constructing a transition metal-NHC complex with improved stability, catalytic reactivity, and selectivity. However, early-transition metal NHC complexes, especially those of group 5, have yet to be explored to the same depth. Despite the significant reactivity of Ta in N2 activation, CO2 activation, chiral hydroaminoalkylation, and C−N bond activation, there are few reports of Ta NHC chemistry. To our knowledge no unsymmetrical NHCs as ligands for group 3−5 metal centers have been previously reported.

Subject:
Poster, Physical Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...031900 - Chemistry
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Thedford Hollis
1115 Hand Laboratory
(662) 325-3584
kh1331@msstate.edu
Technology Development in Agriculture
Abstract:

Undergraduate student needed to assist in the development and testing of technology and sensors in the agricultural production setting. Ideal candidate should be comfortable with embedded systems development such as Arduino and Beagle Bone. Experience in I2C and physical wiring very helpful. On top of the primary assignment, there are numerous other projects underway in which technical or programming skills can be leveraged in the development, testing, or deployment of sensors or technologically-driven agriculture. Some of our projects include methods for application of Unmanned Aerial Systems and data they collect. Working in agriculture means that there will be field work, sample collection, and processing. Yes, it will likely be hot and a little unpleasant. A successful candidate may be able to publish or present their work, develop opportunities for graduate studies, and create potentially licensable technology. An undergraduate student can work up to 20 hours per week and pay is at the top of the scale for students.

Subject:
Agriculture, Embedded Technology
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...010300 - Ag & Bio Engineering
College of Business...048806 - Ctr for Entrepreneurship&Innovation
College of Business...041300 - Management & Information Systems
College of Engineering...062900 - Computer Science and Engineering
College of Engineering...060700 - Electrical and Computer Engineering
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Contact Dr. Jason Ward in Agricultural and Biological Engineering. Jason Ward Assistant Extension Professor Agricultural and Biological Engineering Mississippi State University jason.ward@msstate.edu Office: 662-325-4148 Mobile: 662-769-9737

Responsibilities:

Work along-side faculty and students in developing technology for modern agriculture. Software and hardware development. Collection, processing, and analysis of data collected from sensors. Collection, processing, and analysis of field samples to correlate to sensor outputs. Design and fabrication of mounting systems. Attend lab meeting. Occasional lab maintenance.

Position Details:

Primary project involves the interfacing of small LiDAR sensors to embedded systems for the in-field measurement of specific agricultural cropping system and mechanical system parameters. This data will be spatially referenced. Additional information may need to be collected from the tractor CAN network. All collected data must be synthesized into a usable format for actionable decision making.

Faculty Contact:
Jason Ward
233 J. Charles Lee Agricultural and Biological Engineering
(662) 325-4148
jason.ward@msstate.edu
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO)
Abstract:

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) Summer Internship Program will provide opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to participate in projects focused on helping DNDO meet its mission of “implementing domestic nuclear detection efforts for a managed and coordinated response to radiological and nuclear threats, as well as integration of federal nuclear forensics programs.” This program offers ten-week research experiences at federal research facilities located across the U.S. Undergraduate student receive a stipend of $600 per week plus travel expenses. Graduate students receive a stipend of $700 per week plus travel expenses. Areas of research: Engineering, earth and geosciences, computer science, mathematics, physics, chemistry, biological / life sciences, environmental science, and more.

Subject:
Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) Summer Internship P
College & Department:
College of Engineering...060300 - Chemical Engineering
College of Engineering...060500 - Civil and Environmental Engineering
College of Engineering...032900 - Computer Science
College of Engineering...062900 - Computer Science and Engineering
College of Engineering...060700 - Electrical and Computer Engineering
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

More information about the course can be found at https://www.zintellect.com/Posting/details/824. U.S. citizenship required Application deadline: March 16, 2015, at 12:00 AM For questions please email us at dhsed@orau.org

Responsibilities:

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) Summer Internship Program will provide opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to participate in projects focused on helping DNDO meet its mission of “implementing domestic nuclear detection efforts for a managed and coordinated response to radiological and nuclear threats, as well as integration of federal nuclear forensics programs.” This program offers ten-week research experiences at federal research facilities located across the U.S. Undergraduate student receive a stipend of $600 per week plus travel expenses. Graduate students receive a stipend of $700 per week plus travel expenses. Areas of research: Engineering, earth and geosciences, computer science, mathematics, physics, chemistry, biological / life sciences, environmental science, and more.

Position Details:

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) Summer Internship Program will provide opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to participate in projects focused on helping DNDO meet its mission of “implementing domestic nuclear detection efforts for a managed and coordinated response to radiological and nuclear threats, as well as integration of federal nuclear forensics programs.” This program offers ten-week research experiences at federal research facilities located across the U.S. Undergraduate student receive a stipend of $600 per week plus travel expenses. Graduate students receive a stipend of $700 per week plus travel expenses. Areas of research: Engineering, earth and geosciences, computer science, mathematics, physics, chemistry, biological / life sciences, environmental science, and more.

Faculty Contact:
Scott Maynard
Montgomery Hall Room 300
(662) 325-3344
smaynard@career.msstate.edu
Three-Dimensional In Vitro Models of Vascular Calcification
Abstract:

Vascular calcification is a prominent feature of the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality of many prevalent and widespread medical issues, such as heart disease. Medial vascular calcification is an active process involving the differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into osteoblast-like cells within the artery wall, resulting in bone mineral deposition. This results in a loss of arterial elasticity that leads to hypertension and many more serious cardiovascular complications. Current in vitro models for vascular calcification are two-dimensional and only include VSMCs grown in a calcification medium. We are proposing the development of two unique three dimensional models for vascular calcification that incorporate cells and proteins found in native arteries. One model includes collagen and elastin, the major structural protein in arteries, with VSMCS and the other model includes collagen and vascular endothelial cells. In order to induce calcification, the models will be cultured in a calcification medium of DMEM with 10% FBS, 1% Pen/Strep, 10 mM β-glycerophosphate, 100 nM dexamethasone, and 50 μg/ml ascorbic acid. Controls will receive standard growth medium of DMEM with 10% FBS and 1% Pen/Strep. Once calcification is achieved after 2-4 weeks, the models will be decalcified for 24 hours in 0.6 N HCl then solubilized in 0.1 N NaOH/0.1% SDS. The samples will then be analyzed for calcium content using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Calcium content will be normalized to protein content using BCA Protein Assay. The incorporation of collagen, elastin, and endothelial cells into an in vitro model will help to better recreate how calcification works in vivo. These models will serve to develop future therapies to treat vascular calcification.

Subject:
Poster, Biological Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...010300 - Ag & Bio Engineering
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Chartrisa Simps
123 Agricultural Engineering Bldg.
(662) 325-8279
cls893@msstate.edu
Tug data acquisition
Abstract:

The FedEx Memphis Hub operates 1,200 to 1,500 tugs. This project aims to gather data on their usage patterns by outfitting twelve tugs with a sensor package and data acquisition system. The data gathered will include GPS route, vehicle speed, engine state, transmission state, seat occupancy, fuel level, and video recording. Since many of the tugs are primarily mechanically-controlled vehicles (having no engine or transmission controllers), sensors will be added as necessary. The system must be discreetly integrated so as not to interfere with the driver’s operation of the tug. Data retrieval should be achieved via the cellular network in order to minimize human effort and maintain typical usage patterns of outfitted tugs. Based on data collected, a fuel usage analysis will be completed using a chassis dynamometer. The data collected during this study will support development of tug activity simulations, which can be used to optimize work flow and energy efficiency. Additionally, the data collected will help to identify requirements for future autonomous tug navigation and other advanced features.

Subject:
Data collection, controls and sensors
College & Department:
College of Engineering...192600 - Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems
College of Engineering...061700 - Mechanical Engineering
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Contact me at liu@me.msstate.edu

Responsibilities:

Work with PI's to install sensors and data acquisition system onto FedEx tugs and test them

Position Details:

Undergraduate student research assistant at CAVS

Faculty Contact:
Yucheng Liu
210 Carpenter Hall
(662) 325-3260
yl86@msstate.edu
Undergraduate Research in Computational Biology - Multiple Subjects
Abstract:

Algorithms for High Throughput Sequencing High throughput sequencing technologies are generating a wealth of sequence data. These technologies are often used to obtain sequences from DNA or RNA samples and perform computation and analysis of digital gene expression values. However, these short sequence “reads” must be aligned to an available reference genome before generating such values. An ongoing research project in the Perkins lab is to study sequence mapping and design improved algorithms for mapping transcribed sequences. Understanding Duplications in Vertebrate Gene Families The Hoffmann Lab is focused on understanding biological diversity from a genomic standpoint, with occasional forays in the molecular evolution of viruses, and on the diversification of mammalian species. Most of the work is focused towards understanding the relative contribution of gene and whole genome duplications to the expansion of vertebrate gene families and the origin of biological innovations, and on assessing the potential role of natural selection on the acquisition of novel biological functions. In particular we are very keen on mammalian gene families, which provide an outstanding model for these types of questions. Because vertebrate globins are one of the most studied gene families from a biochemical, structural, functional, and molecular standpoints, we can use the tools of comparative genomics, phylogenetic analyses and molecular evolution to great advantage in this system. Accordingly, students in the Hoffmann Lab will be involved with learning to analyze genomic sequence data to understand copy number variation, and assess the evolutionary forces underlying the observed patterns of variation. Interactive Visualization of Biological Data REU projects for bioinformatics will challenge students to work together with computer scientists and biology experts to solve complex problems via interactive computer graphics. While two examples of such projects are given below, actual projects will be determined in collaboration with application scientist and the student. Extend MSAVis: MSAVis (Figure 1) has several feasible extensions that can be tackled in parallel by dedicated students; two are presented here. First, as it stands, MSAVis does not allow editing of protein sequences to test different alignment hypotheses; this is a feature of interest to its users. A student would add this functionality which would involve modifying MSAVis' interaction mechanisms and integrating it with sequence alignment software. Second, there are additional protein features that could be integrated such as binding sites or information about secondary structure. Such a project would involve designing the visual metaphors for the added information and designing the interface to query the biological databases to extract them. Gene Atlas: In this web-based tool (Figure 2), a gene atlas will be refined. The gene atlas allows the efficient comparison of multiple gene expression samples (usually from species at different times in their life cycle) to be compared efficiently. Additional interaction methods and visual metaphors could be explored to make this a tool with genuine impact on biological studies. Functional Genomics in Developmental Biology Dr. Memili’s research areas include functional genomics of mammalian gamete and embryo development, and epigenetics of stem cells, stemming from his experiences from the graduate research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and from postdoctoral research at Harvard Medical School, respectively. The REU students will conduct original, hypothesis research to ascertain developmental mechanisms in the gametes and embryos, and maintenance of stemness in adult stem cells, adipose derived stem cells (ASC). The research involves multidisciplinary approaches such developmental biology, computational biology, and epigenetics. The students will apply diverse approaches including in vitro fertilization of bovine and mouse oocytes and culture of embryos and ASC. Specific projects will include identification and manipulation of specific sperm borne microRNAs regulating embryo development, and microRNAs of ASC controlling stemness. Transcriptome Analysis Using RNA-Seq Transcriptome analysis methods using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) enables monitoring of changes in gene expression with high accuracy. Since this method of studying transcriptomes offers an unbiased snapshot of gene expression with increased sensitivity, dynamic range and discriminatory power compared to microarrays, it has immense potential for host-pathogen systems biology. The so called “dual RNA-Seq” , in principle can determine the temporal gene expression changes in the host and pathogen during infection. The promise of this next generation sequencing technological advance can only be fulfilled, with parallel advances in computational strategies for addressing the data analysis challenge involved in mapping the sequencing reads from a single run to multiple species i.e. host and pathogen. The data analysis issues are exacerbated when one looks at multifactorial syndrome such as Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD). BRD in cattle is caused by a number of viral and bacterial pathogens. Conducting RNA-Seq from the terminal site of infection i.e infected bovine lung tissue is expected to capture gene expression changes in the bovine host and bacterial pathogens such as M .haemolytica, P.multocida and H. somnus, to name a few (Figure 3). Thus BRD RNA-Seq extends the dual RNA-Seq concept to a single host and multiple pathogens, increasing the complexity of the informatic challenges posed by the data. Mapping RNA-Seq reads in this scenario could possibly require a metatranscriptomic approach to identifying common bacterial functions and pathways. There is a need for evaluating the suitability of existing algorithms such as Maq, Bowtie, or others for mapping RNA-Seq reads multiple genomes. It is conceivable that the algorithms would require ‘scaling up’. It is also possible that we would need to build on these methods or develop completely novel methods. The undergraduate participants of this application will participate in all the above said aspects of developing a computational framework for mapping RNA-Seq reads to multiple species. We will use a synthetic dataset to develop these methods. The available bovine RNA-Seq data from public resources as well as our RNA-Seq data for M. haemolytica, P. multocida and H. somnus will be combined to generate a dataset for all species involved in the infection. Understanding Emergence and Adaptation of Oseltamivir and Amantadine Drug-Resistance in Influenza A Viruses Using Machine Learning Influenza A viruses may cause a pandemic disaster that will impact multiple continents as well as seasonal influenza epidemics through single or multiple nations. Four documented influenza pandemics occurred in 1918, 1957, 1968, and 2009. More than 40 million people were killed in the 1918 pandemic. The peak influenza season in the northern hemisphere is from January to April every year. More than 200,000 hospitalizations and up to 49,000 deaths are caused by influenza in the United States each year. In addition, influenza A viruses can cause infections in birds and other animals, and lead to large economic losses and financial burdens. For instance, the ongoing epidemics of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in Asia, Europe, and Africa has caused the culling of at least 220 million of birds since the first detection of this virus by Wan. Two main classes of anti-influenza drugs include neuraminidase inhibitors, such as zanamivir and oseltamivir, or viral M2 protein inhibitor, such as amantadine and rimantadine. They are used clinically to reduce disease symptoms in patients. However, the emergence of drug resistance has been a continuous challenge to influenza treatment. As of 2010, human seasonal influenza A viruses, H1N1 and H3N2, have been found to be nearly 100 percent resistant to oseltamivir and amantadine, respectively. Molecular characterization of influenza A viruses recovered from influenza surveillance in Asia demonstrated that there about are up to 95% of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virues containing M2 inhibitor resistance markers in Vietnam and Thailand and that there are about 8.9 in China. The drug resistance can result either from inappropriate usage of drugs or hitch-hiking mutation, a common factor resulting in adamantine resistance in human H3N2 influenza viruses. Previous research showed that oseltamivir-resistance (H1N1) is linked to an H275Y amino acid mutation on the neuraminidase (NA) viral surface glycoprotein, while amantadine-resistance (H3N2) is associated with an S31N amino acid mutation on the viral M2 matrix protein. However, the mutations associated with H275Y in H1N1 virus and S31N in H3N2 virus and their roles in the emergence and adaptation of drug resistant strains are still unknown. The objective of this study is to develop and apply novel machine learning techniques to identify the molecular markers which are highly correlated with the mutation linked to drug resistance. The recruited undergraduate in this REU program will he trained to develop novel machine learning algorithms based on previously developed methods in Wan Lab. These findings will potentially facilitate a greater understanding of the role of correlated mutations in emergence and adaptation of drug resistance in influenza A viruses. Indel Detection in Genome-Wide Association Studies The advent of high throughput genotyping by sequencing (GBS) gives geneticists a new tool with which to answer questions regarding gene identification, genetic diversity and relationships, and increased gain from selection in practical breeding program of crop plants. It also allows for the generation of data sets of unprecedented size. However, bioinformatics tools to store, query, and analyze these data sets in a meaningful fashion are still needed, and user friendly tools in particular will make the data more useful to the biologists who will use and interpret it. One such data set has been generated by the USDA ARS Corn Host Plant Resistance Research Unit on the Mississippi State University campus. This data consists of sequencing data from 292 maize inbred lines. A preliminary analysis using the Cornell GBS bioinformatics pipeline (http://www.maizegenetics.net/gbs-bioinformatics) has allowed the alignment of the 292 genomic sequences against the maize B73 genomic reference sequence (www.maizesequence.org). From there, we can begin to investigate the differences in the genetic sequence between the 292 maize lines. We hope to determine how each of the lines are related to each other, and to associate the differences in the genetic sequences with differences in response of each line to infection with the plant pathogen Aspergillus flavus, and the associated production by the pathogen of aflatoxin, a toxic and carcinogenic metabolite of the fungus. This will allow us to identify genes associated with resistance, and to breed resistant new maize cultivars in the future. A query tool has been created that will identify and extract Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) from the sequences. SNPs are differences in the genetic sequence at a single base pair. Other differences include insertion/deletion polymorphisms (InDels), which correspond to deletions of one up to several thousand base pairs of DNA into the sequence of one line compared to that of another (or, the deletion of the sequence in one line compared to another). InDel polymorphisms are ideal for studying gene function from DNA sequences, because they are large, easily identifiable within a small number of samples, and can lead to differential functioning of a gene. However, in a large sample or in a very long sequence, the identification of InDels has been extremely problematic due to very large computational requirements. Therefore, this project will determine a method for identifying InDels using an InDel alighment tool created using the BLAST (Basic Logical Alignment Search Tool, (http://www.maizegenetics.net/gbs-bioinformatics) on a small sample, and expand the size of the sample (both number of lines and length of sequence) that can be efficiently analyzed. Determining this threshold and then seeking methods so surpass will lead to exceedingly useful tools to better use the data available to us Population Genetics of Helianthus Annuus Research projects for undergraduates will be designed to both generate usable data, and serve as complete introductions to hypothesis driven research. Projects will be focused in one of two areas, the role of microsatellites as agents of adaptive evolution in sunflowers, and the population genetics of iguanas. For example, students involved in screening microsatellites for amplification and variability in sunflowers will be testing the hypothesis that EST derived microsatellites are under greater evolutionary constraint. The prediction that follows from this hypothesis is that anonymous loci should harbor more variation than EST derived loci. Students will learn how to perform fragment analysis, and basic computational biology associated with population genetics. Students collecting data on seed set and seed mass could test the hypothesis that variance in reproductive success varies across multiple populations. In this way, students are involved in meaningful research, and they are introduced to the entire process of science from hypothesis development to reporting. Students studying iguanas are using heterozygote excess, and fitness correlations to improve our understanding of the role that mutational load plays in dictating small population dynamics.

Subject:
Multiple Projects - See Below
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011300 - Animal & Dairy Science
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011900 - Biochem,MolBio,Entmology&Plant Path
College of Arts & Sciences...031100 - Biological Sciences
College of Engineering...032900 - Computer Science
College of Veterinary Medicine...182000 - CVM Basic Science Department
Other - USDA
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Go to https://compbio.wufoo.com/forms/application-submission/ to complete application.

Responsibilities:

For additional details go to http://web.cse.msstate.edu/~compbio/index.html or contact: Contact: Dr. Andy Perkins PO Box 9637 Mississippi State, MS 39762 (662) 325-0004 compbio@cse.msstate.edu

Position Details:

Research opportunities in artificial intelligence, algorithms, graphics and visualization, functional genomics, genome analysis, bio-ontologies, and other areas. When: May 31-August 6, 2016 Program features: Valuable research experience in the labs of our faculty mentors Professional development sessions and social activities $525 per week stipend On-campus housing provided Partial meal allowance Partial travel reimbursement Minimum requirements: Rising sophomore or higher Minimum 2.5 GPA Solid background in computer science or the life sciences US citizen or permanent resident Application deadline: March 1, 2016.

Faculty Contact:
Scott Maynard
Montgomery Hall Room 300
(662) 325-3344
smaynard@career.msstate.edu
Understanding How Surface Curvature Modulates Gold Nanoparticle-Protein Interact
Abstract:

Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are an important subject of research in the biomedical community as applications for its use are being regularly discovered and refined. One potential use for AuNPs is attaching proteins to the nanoparticle surface and using the AuNPs as couriers in drug delivery systems. Research shows that proteins adsorb easily to the surface of gold AuNPs, however the extent to which proteins interact with AuNPs on a residue-specific level has yet to be elucidated. Furthermore, research into protein-protein interactions on the surface of AuNPs has yet to be fully realized. Analysis has shown that nanoparticle size and shape influences protein structure and stability. Proteins on nanorods have been shown to be less stable than on nanospheres and proteins on smaller nanoparticles have been shown to be more stable than proteins on larger nanospheres. Surface curvature seems to play a significant role in these protein-protein and protein-AuNP interactions. However, investigations to date have failed to yield the high-resolution structural details necessary to understand the mechanisms behind protein-AuNP adsorption. Therefore, the goal of this research is to produce a clearer understanding of the protein-protein and protein-AuNP interactions occurring on nanoparticle surfaces. Specifically, the research will focus on the effects that nanoparticle surface curvature has upon these interactions. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and electron microscopy (TEM), we intend to provide a definitive illustration of the interactions occurring between the proteins and the nanoparticles at a microscopic level. Our results could have a profound and positive impact on our understanding of the interactions occurring at the surface of AuNPs leading to straightforward and facile design of AuNPs for drug targeting and other biomedical applications.

Subject:
Poster Competition - Shackouls Honors College
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...031900 - Chemistry
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Closed

Responsibilities:

Closed

Position Details:

Closed

Faculty Contact:
Dr. Nicholas Fi
Hand Chemical Lab Room 115
662-325-1288
nfitzkee@chemistry.msstate.edu
Use of a Glyphosate-Tolerant Perennial Ryegrass Cultivar in the Southeast
Abstract:

Turfgrass managers often overseed dormant bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.) with perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) (PRG) to improve aesthetics, wear tolerance, uniformity, and to provide dark green winter color. However, control of problematic weeds in stands of PRG is limited. The introduction of a glyphosate-tolerant PRG cultivar, ‘Replay’, provides a unique tool in weed control for turfgrass managers. However, limited information exists regarding its use in overseeded bermudagrass. Therefore, field trials were initiated to determine the optimal rate and timing of glyphosate applications that cause minimal injury to Replay PRG. Glyphosate was applied as single and/or sequential applications in March, April, and May 2013 and 2014 at rates of 0, 0.29, 0.58, 0.87, and 1.16 kg acid equivalent (ae) ha-1. Overall, 30 days after a single glyphosate application > 0.29 kg ae ha-1 resulted in marginal PRG color; however, all plots treated with glyphosate ≤ 0.87 kg ae ha-1 fully recovered 40DAIA. Regarding sequential applications, safest treatments were noted at rates ≤ 0.58 kg ae ha-1 when applied 8 weeks apart in March followed by May. An application interval of 4 weeks should be avoided if rates exceed 0.29 kg ae ha-1 due to season long reduction in Replay color. Also, bermudagrass injury from glyphosate treatments was not noted in July for both years, which indicates safety to the bermudagrass stand.

Subject:
Poster Competition, Biological Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Ag & Life Sciences...011100 - Plant and Soil Sciences
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Christian Baldw
117 Dorman Hall
(662) 325-2311
cmb907@msstate.edu
Using molecular genetic markers to study hybridization among orchids
Abstract:

In this research experience, students will help to develop new molecular genetic markers for a pair of native orchid species. The markers will then be used to collect genetic data to determine whether hybridization occurs between these species. The project is will be entirely lab based and provide experience in the use of PCR, DNA sequencing, and genotyping, which are commonly used in modern molecular biology.

Subject:
Plant molecular ecology
College & Department:
College of Arts & Sciences...031100 - Biological Sciences
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Send a letter of interest, resume, and list of two references to Dr. Lisa Wallace via email (lisawallace@biology.msstate.edu).

Responsibilities:

Perform lab techniques as requested by the PI involving PCR, DNA sequencing, and related techniques; maintain a lab notebook; participate in lab group meetings and present results.

Position Details:

This position is funded by the Office of Research and Economic Development as an Undergraduate Research experience. Thus, it is expected that the student has an interest in gaining research experience in biology, and specifically evolutionary ecology. The student need not have extensive experience or coursework in botany, but he/she should have a basic understanding of evolutionary biology principles. All necessary training will be provided in the lab. A limited stipend is available for work on teh project. Opportunities will be provided for presentation of research results at the Biology Undergraduate Research Program Symposium and potentially other scientific meetings this summer. Questions should be addressed to Dr. Lisa Wallace (lisawallace@biology.msstate.edu).

Faculty Contact:
Lisa Wallace
Harned Hall, Rm 007
(662) 325-7575
lisawallace@biology.msstate.edu
Weather Goest Thou
Abstract:

The main objective of "Weather Goest Thou" was to be able to track the flight path of a weather balloon as it ascended above Starkville. Since we live in a world with moving air, the balloon is not expected to remain stationary above the launch site at all times; factoring in wind speed and wind direction values, the balloon could end up virtually anywhere. And one must take into account that when a relatively small weather balloon floats really high in the air, it expands to about three times its normal size. The easy route would have been to use an existing set of data for the atmosphere above Starkville, but we took the more complicated approach, as an engineer naturally does. Why? Other than the sheer excitement of over-complicating things, the Starkville data does not exist, yet. Using a nifty set of “general” values for the atmosphere above the Earth, called the Standard Atmosphere, and weather data (specifically density, wind speed, and wind direction) from the cities of Birmingham, Jackson, and Little Rock, the atmosphere above Starkville was able to be predicted and averaged. Mathcad, a powerful calculation program, allowed us to use equations to represent a general picture of the air motion above the launch site, and also the size, ascent rate, and air drag of the balloon. This yielded a mathematic representation of the balloon’s flight path. Using Google Earth, we were able to successfully create a 3-D picture of the balloon’s predicted course. Our method of gathering atmospheric data allows for any city’s atmospheric conditions to be averaged and compiled, and also enables for the accurate prediction of a launched balloon’s trajectory.

Subject:
Poster, Physical Sciences & Engineering
College & Department:
College of Engineering...060100 - Aerospace Engineering
393400 - Shackouls Honors College -
Positions:
No positions are currently available for this project

How to Apply:

Position Closed

Responsibilities:

Position Closed

Position Details:

Position Closed

Faculty Contact:
Dr. Keith Koeni
Aerospace Engineering
7286
koenig@ae.msstate.edu